Treasure Island

Omar Khayyam

(1048–1131 / Nishapur / Iran)

Omar Khayyam
Do you like this poet?
350 person liked.
29 person did not like.

Omar Khayyám (1048 – 1131‎) was a Persian polymath: philosopher, mathematician, astronomer and poet. He also wrote treatises on mechanics, geography, mineralogy, music, climatology and Islamic theology.

Born in Nishapur, at a young age he moved to Samarkand and obtained his education there, afterwards he moved to Bukhara and became established as one of the major mathematicians and astronomers of the medieval period. He is the author of one of the most important treatises on algebra written before modern times, the Treatise on Demonstration of Problems of Algebra, which includes a geometric method for solving cubic equations by intersecting a hyperbola with a circle. He ... more »

Click here to add this poet to your My Favorite Poets.

Quotations

more quotations »
  • '''Tis all a Chequer-board of Nights and Days
    Where Destiny with Men for Pieces plays:
    Hither and thither moves, and mates, and slays,
    And one by one back in the Closet lays.''
    Omar Khayyám (11-12th century), Persian astronomer, poet. The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, st. 49, trans. by Edward FitzGerald, first edition (1859).
  • ''And that inverted Bowl we call The Sky,
    Whereunder crawling coop't we live and die,
    Lift not thy hands to It for help—for It
    Rolls impotently on as Thou or I.''
    Omar Khayyám (11-12th century), Persian astronomer, poet. The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, st. 52, trans. by Edward Fitzgerald (1859).
  • ''Alas that Spring should vanish with the rose,
    That youth's sweet manuscript should close.''
    Omar Khayyám (1048?-1122), Persian poet, astronomer. The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám.
  • ''Drink! for you know not whence you came nor why:
    Drink! for you know not why you go, nor where.''
    Omar Khayyám (c. 1048-1122), Persian astronomer, poet. The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, st. 74, trans. by Edward FitzGerald (1879).
  • ''Oh, the brave Music of a distant Drum!''
    Omar Khayyám (11-12th century), Persian astronomer and poet. The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, st. 12, trans. by Edward FitzGerald, first edition (1859).
Read more quotations »

Comments about Omar Khayyam

more comments »
Click here to write your comments about Omar Khayyam
  • Sharon Goodsall (3/10/2013 9:44:00 AM)

    Each quatrain is a complete verse and needs to be pondered and meditated upon to find its meaning. The profound words in these verses give meaning to the universe, time and life. It is my constant companion and whilst it cannot heal my broken heart it lend it peace

  • Rosa Jamali (7/19/2008 11:34:00 AM)

    It wasn't easy to praise wine in twelfth century Iran.After a long time that Baghdad had ruled in Iran; an Independent Iranian government was just going to be established. In Khayyam's poetry there's a sense of nostalgia towards old Persia with all i...more It wasn't easy to praise wine in twelfth century Iran.After a long time that Baghdad had ruled in Iran; an Independent Iranian government was just going to be established. In Khayyam's poetry there's a sense of nostalgia towards old Persia with all its mythological kings as Jamshid and Keikhosru. If you compare his poetry with some of his contemporaries you see the difference. In his contemporary poetry you could see lots of poems in praise of prophet Mohammad and Imams but khayyam was the brave one who depicted a real mistress in his poetry; as he talks about beautiful women and wine and he questions death and orthodox Muslims. There's a quite difference here. The mistress in Khayyam's poetry is really a woman not an imaginary character or probably a man as it was very common in Persian poetry. In some sufi poetry there's a range of vocabulary which is repetitive and addictive and cliche but the choice of vocabulary in Khayyam is live and real...

Read all 2 comments »

Top Poets

PoemHunter.com Updates

[Hata Bildir]