Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

Emily Dickinson
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Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After she studied at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence.

Although Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen... more »

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Quotations

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  • ''Will you tell me my fault, frankly as to yourself, for I had rather wince, than die. Men do not call the surgeon to commend the bone, but to set it, Sir.''
    Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Letter, July 1862, to Thomas Wentworth Higginson. The Letters of Emily Dickinson, vol. 2 (1958). Higginson...
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Comments about Emily Dickinson

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  • Rookie - 0 Points Gordon Inverno Jr. (4/22/2015 10:08:00 AM)

    My favorite: Because I Could Not Stop for Death

  • Rookie - 0 Points Gordon Inverno Jr. (4/22/2015 10:01:00 AM)

    Emily is the Best of the Best! ! ! !

  • Bronze Star - 2,970 Points John Richter (4/7/2015 12:43:00 PM)

    Did Dan Reynolds below really offer tips to Emily Dickinson? Dan, she dead bro. More than just that, she is (arguably) the greatest American poet to have ever lived... I'm sure that she would appreciate the pointers. Oh, I'm sorry man - that was just an easy shot. But listen, you should read her biography. I think you'll find her one of the loveliest creatures to have ever lived. It appears that Eric below gets it - During her entire life critics and poetical societies kept her out, saying things a lot like you said... After she died she became the most widely published American poet ever... Guess they were wrong. I wrote a poem about such tragedy, Lost Indifference of a Learned Critic. I had no plans until I saw these remarks. Hope you have a moment to read it. Balash, you are right - that is exactly what she did - along with a few others.

  • Rookie - 0 Points Balash Salamatbakhsh (3/26/2015 9:20:00 PM)

    Emily Dickinson gave a new meaning to poetry. I admire her for her verses shakes my soul.

  • Freshman - 716 Points Giorgio Veneto (1/6/2015 1:50:00 PM)

    The semi-antique colonial English language used by Emily causes the experienced reader to slow his pace while reading her poetry. I love her style. She is laconic and she is spiritual and feminine.

  • Freshman - 716 Points Giorgio Veneto (1/6/2015 1:46:00 PM)

    The semi-antique colonial English language used by Emily causes the experienced reader to slow his pace while reading her poetry. I love her style. She is laconic and she is spiritual and feminine.

  • Silver Star - 7,657 Points Eric Ericson (11/26/2014 8:07:00 AM)

    unnoticed in your day -
    behind your wall or in your garden fair -
    your bloom - unwanted -
    falling to us to enjoy

  • Rookie - 9 Points Srimayee Ganguly (10/7/2014 12:36:00 PM)

    Her language is mesmerizing, haunting, irresistibly charming- a pure genius.

  • Veteran Poet - 1,398 Points Dan Reynolds (9/23/2014 7:31:00 AM)

    You show some promise, but the archaic language lets you down. Try to read some good contemporary poets and expand your thoughts without the restriction of form.

  • Rookie S B (5/5/2014 5:39:00 PM)

    classic poems! like her use of vocabulary

Read all 52 comments »
Best Poem of Emily Dickinson

Hope' Is The Thing With Feathers

'Hope' is the thing with feathers—
That perches in the soul—
And sings the tune without the words—
And never stops—at all—

And sweetest—in the Gale—is heard—
And sore must be the storm—
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm—

I've heard it in the chillest land—
And on the strangest Sea—
Yet, never, in Extremity,
It asked a crumb—of Me.

Read the full of Hope' Is The Thing With Feathers
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