Thomas Hardy

(2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928 / Dorchester / England)

Thomas Hardy Poems

1. The Choirmaster's Burial 5/3/2016
2. The Pity Of It 4/10/2010
3. The Roman Gravemounds 4/10/2010
4. The Respectable Burgher On "The Higher Criticism" 1/4/2003
5. To A Sea-Cliff 3/16/2015
6. The Re-Enactment 4/10/2010
7. The Satin Shoes 4/10/2010
8. The Wistful Lady 4/10/2010
9. The Problem 1/4/2003
10. New Year's Eve 12/10/2015
11. To Meet, Or Otherwise 4/10/2010
12. The Sacrilege: (A Ballad-Tragedy) 4/10/2010
13. The Recalcitrants 4/10/2010
14. Before Marching and After 8/31/2015
15. The Woman In The Rye 4/10/2010
16. The Spell Of The Rose 4/10/2010
17. The Telegram 4/10/2010
18. The Fallow Deer At The Lonely House 2/7/2015
19. The West-Of-Wessex Girl 4/10/2010
20. V.R. 1819-1901, A Reverie 1/4/2003
21. Tolerance 4/10/2010
22. Rain on a Grave 7/14/2015
23. The Sun On The Bookcase 4/10/2010
24. Welcome Home 4/10/2010
25. The Slow Nature 12/31/2002
26. The Sleep-Worker 1/4/2003
27. Valenciennes 12/31/2002
28. The Supplanter: A Tale 1/4/2003
29. V.R. 1819-1901 (A Reverie.) 1/1/2004
30. The Widow 1/4/2003
31. The Rambler 1/3/2003
32. Thought Of Ph---A At News Of Her Death 12/31/2002
33. The Tree: An Old Man's Story 1/4/2003
34. The Puzzled Game-Birds (Triolet) 1/4/2003
35. The Sergeant's Song 12/31/2002
36. The Walk 4/10/2010
37. To Outer Nature 12/31/2002
38. The Sun On The Bookcase 1/3/2003
39. The Sweet Hussy 4/10/2010
40. The Selfsame Song 1/3/2003
Best Poem of Thomas Hardy

"I Said To Love"

I said to Love,
"It is not now as in old days
When men adored thee and thy ways
   All else above;
Named thee the Boy, the Bright, the One
Who spread a heaven beneath the sun,"
   I said to Love.

   I said to him,
"We now know more of thee than then;
We were but weak in judgment when,
   With hearts abrim,
We clamoured thee that thou would'st please
Inflict on us thine agonies,"
   I said to him.

   I said to Love,
"Thou art not young, ...

Read the full of "I Said To Love"

The Problem

Shall we conceal the Case, or tell it -
   We who believe the evidence?
   Here and there the watch-towers knell it
   With a sullen significance,
Heard of the few who hearken intently and carry an eagerly upstrained
sense.

   Hearts that are happiest hold not by it;
   Better we let, then, the old view reign;

[Report Error]