Robert Herrick

(1591-1674 / London / England)

Robert Herrick
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Clergyman and poet, Robert Herrick was born in London, the seventh child of Nicholas Herrick, a wealthy goldsmith. In November 1592, two days after making a will, his father killed himself by jumping from the fourth-floor window of his house. However, the Queen's Almoner did not confiscate the Herrick estate for the crown as was usually the case with suicides. There is no record of Herrick attending school. In 1607 he was apprenticed to his uncle Sir William Herrick as a goldsmith.

'A Country Life: To his Brother M. Tho. Herrick' (1610) is Herrick's earliest known poem, and deals with the move from London to farm life in Leicestershire. 'To My Dearest Sister M. Merice Herrick' was... more »

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Comments about Robert Herrick

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  • Rookie Emma Shaw (12/8/2010 2:14:00 PM)

    I have just won a one euro bet that the name of this poem was to daffodils and not to the daffodils. It's a great poem, and nicer in my view than the much more famous wordsworth poem.

  • Rookie Cado Bell (10/12/2006 10:52:00 AM)

    Saw this poem on a crammed tube train in London about 30 years ago.
    had nowhere to look except at the angled adverts above. (alliteration unintended)
    -and it just stuck.

    Don't remember even learning it off.
    and now thanks to this wonderful website I found it again.

Read all 2 comments »
Best Poem of Robert Herrick

To The Virgins, Make Much Of Time

Gather ye rose-buds while ye may:
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles to-day,
To-morrow will be dying.

The glorious lamp of heaven, the Sun,
The higher he's a-getting,
The sooner will his race be run,
And nearer he's to setting.

That age is best, which is the first,
When youth and blood are warmer;
But being spent, the worse, and worst
Times, still succeed the former.

- Then be not coy, but use your time,
And while ye may, go marry;
For having lost but once your prime,
You may for ever tarry.

Read the full of To The Virgins, Make Much Of Time Updates

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