Treasure Island

Robert Herrick

(1591-1674 / London / England)

Quotations

  • ''or the warm soft side
    Of the resigning yet resisting bride.
    The kiss of virgins first-fruits of the bed;
    Soft speech, smooth touch, the lips, the maidenhead;
    These and a thousand sweets could never be
    So near or dear as thou wast once to me.''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Farewell to Sack (l. 5-10). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
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  • '''Tis not Apollo can, or those thrice three
    Castalian sisters sing, if wanting thee.
    Horace, Anacreon both had lost their fame.
    Had'st thou not filled them with thy fire and flame.''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Farewell to Sack (l. 29-32). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''Let my muse
    Fail of thy former helps, and only use
    Her inadulterate strength. What's done by me
    Hereafter shall smell of the lamp, not thee.''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Farewell to Sack (l. 51-54). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''A Cat
    I keep, that playes about my House,
    Grown fat,
    With eating many a miching Mouse.
    To these
    A Trasy I do keep, whereby
    I please
    The more my rurall privacie:
    Which are
    But toyes, to give my heart some ease:
    Where care
    None is, slight things do lightly please.''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Grange, or Private Wealth (l. 21-32). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.
  • ''When the tempter me pursueth
    With the sins of all my youth,
    And half damns me with untruth,
    Sweet Spirit, comfort me!'''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Litany to the Holy Spirit (l. 37-40). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
  • ''When the artless doctor sees
    No one hope, but of his fees,
    And his skill runs on the lees;
    Sweet Spirit, comfort me!
    When his potion and his pill,
    Has, or none, or little skill,
    Meet for nothing, but to kill;
    Sweet Spirit, comfort me!''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet, clergyman. repr. In The Poems of Robert Herrick, ed. L.C. Martin (1956). His Litany to the Holy Spirit, st. 4-5, Noble Numbers (1647).
  • ''In the hour of my distress,
    When temptations me oppress,
    And when I my sins confess,
    Sweet Spirit comfort me!''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Litany to the Holy Spirit (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Onely a little more
    I have to write,
    Then I'll give o'er,
    And bid the world Good-night.''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Poetry His Pillar (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
  • ''O time that cut'st down all!
    And scarce leav'st here
    Memoriall
    Of any men that were.''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Poetry His Pillar (l. 9-12). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
  • ''When I a verse shall make,
    Know I have prayed thee,
    For old religion's sake,
    Saint Ben, to aid me.''
    Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Prayer to Ben Jonson (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.

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THE MAD MAID'S SONG

Good morrow to the day so fair;
Good morning, sir, to you;
Good morrow to mine own torn hair,
Bedabbled with the dew.

Good morning to this primrose too;
Good morrow to each maid;
That will with flowers the tomb bestrew
Wherein my Love is laid.

[Hata Bildir]