William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Previous Month February 2014 Next Month
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 1 2
Poem of the Day
Select a day from the calendar.
Would you like to see the poem of the day in your e-mail box every morning?
Your email address:
  Subscribe FREE
  Unsubscribe

Hark! Hark! The Lark


Hark! hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings,
And Phoebus 'gins arise,
His steeds to water at those springs
On chalic'd flowers that lies;
And winking Mary-buds begin
To ope their golden eyes;
With everything that pretty is,
My lady sweet, arise:
Arise, arise!

Submitted: Friday, January 03, 2003

Do you like this poem?
40 person liked.
11 person did not like.

What do you think this poem is about?



Read poems about / on: water, heaven, spring, flower

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (Hark! Hark! The Lark by William Shakespeare )

Enter the verification code :

  • Gold Star - 18,893 Points Aftab Alam Khursheed (9/1/2014 9:25:00 PM)

    Awesome, abrupt. beginning..Hark Hark silky and soft ending- My lady sweet, arise: Arise, arise! lovely thank you PH (Report) Reply

  • Veteran Poet - 4,890 Points Carlos Echeverria (2/8/2012 10:25:00 AM)

    Duke Ellington admired Shakespeare, saying about: he must've spent a lot of time on the street corner. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 125 Points Manonton Dalan (2/8/2012 4:24:00 AM)

    genius tend to over analyzed things
    but for a simple man with simple mind
    this could be just early morning when
    sun is barely rising; horses drinks on
    spring; wake-up my lady-rise and shine. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 125 Points Kevin Straw (2/8/2010 6:59:00 AM)

    This seems awkward for Shakespeare: 'His steeds to water at those springs/On chaliced flowers that lies...'

    I google the following which sets the lyric in the play:

    In Shakespeare's Cymbeline, Cloten uses lewd language to talk about Cymbeline. In an attempt to use musicians to court her, he calls on them to play 'a wonderful sweet air'. The hark, hark! ... line is chosen to represent sweetness and refinement, as a counterpoint to the previous crudities. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 125 Points Joseph Poewhit (2/8/2010 6:07:00 AM)

    Seems like a flowery love poem of the era. BUT, he was the playwright and still is today. A psychoanalysis before the word was in vogue (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 125 Points Terence George Craddock (2/8/2010 2:38:00 AM)

    An interesting analogy, Phoebus the god Apollo and a personification of the sun, arises and waters his spirited horses using chaliced flowers like a communion cup. With the light Phoebus bestows, beauty dawns anew in preparation for the harkened awakening of his love. A beautiful romantic theme.
    I am not sure the phrase 'the king of romantic poetry' adequately fits or that this was Shakespeare's goal. Shakespeare in his plays and poetry has accurately depicted, every human emotional personality type, with unique insight. His intuitive observations and perceptive genius, invented forensic detail and analysis of character types, before the modern scientific era attained the process. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 156 Points Ramesh T A (2/8/2010 1:03:00 AM)

    What a beautiful situation! The depiction of hilarious situation, the opening eye of flower bud, etc. for waking up to enjoy life the lover begins before his lady love wakes up! Shakespeare, the king of romantic poetry is forever a joy to read! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 121 Points Hugh Dungey (2/5/2008 6:41:00 AM)

    Although most copies of Shakespeare show the poem as written, the correct version is 'evrything that pretty bin', not 'is'. Otherwise it doesn't rhyme. My Shakespeare (Collins 1958) shows 'bin'. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 121 Points Egal Bohen (11/9/2007 4:32:00 PM)

    Chaliced flowers, Golden eyes
    Language to the heavens fly
    Thank you Will.. (Report) Reply

Read all 16 comments »

New Poems

  1. Sooner or later عاجلا ام اجلا, MOHAMMAD SKATI
  2. Trying To Play The Fools Game, Poetic Lilly Emery
  3. Dragons Of The Night, David Harris
  4. Spread Some Love, Tirupathi Chandrupatla
  5. True Romance, Electric Lady
  6. For every smile thus there the stars of .., Raymond Sawyer
  7. he Gift, david kush
  8. I'm always like this, MOHAMMAD SKATI
  9. Soar Where Those Poor Of Faith Reside, Lawrence S. Pertillar
  10. He told the officers, Cyndi K. Gacosta

Poem of the Day

poet George Gordon Byron

It is the hour when from the boughs
The nightingale's high note is heard;
It is the hour -- when lover's vows
Seem sweet in every whisper'd word;
And gentle winds and waters near,
...... Read complete »

 

Modern Poem

poet May Swenson

 

Member Poem

Trending Poems

  1. It Is the Hour, George Gordon Byron
  2. Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep, Mary Elizabeth Frye
  3. The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost
  4. Phenomenal Woman, Maya Angelou
  5. Still I Rise, Maya Angelou
  6. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night, Dylan Thomas
  7. Fire and Ice, Robert Frost
  8. If You Forget Me, Pablo Neruda
  9. Annabel Lee, Edgar Allan Poe
  10. This is Just to Say, William Carlos Williams

Trending Poets

[Hata Bildir]