William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I am glad I was up so late, for that's the reason I was up
    so early.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cloten, in Cymbeline, act 2, sc. 3, l. 33-4. He has been gaming all night, and so was early enough to pay musicians to sing at sunrise to wake Imogen.
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  • ''I have told you enough of this. For my part I'll not meddle nor make no farther.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pandarus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 1, l. 13-14. "Meddle nor make" was a proverbial phrase, "make" meaning "have anything to do with it"; he is refusing to help Troilus.
  • ''My chief humor is for a tyrant. I could play Ercles rarely, or a part to tear a cat in, to make all split.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 1, sc. 2, l. 29-30. "Humor" means inclination; "Ercles" is Bottom's corruption of Hercules; to "tear a cat" on the stage is to rant and bluster.
  • ''Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I ha' lost my reputation, I ha' lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassio, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3.
  • ''There are many events in the womb of time which will be delivered.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 369-70.
  • ''He uses his folly like a stalking-horse, and under the presentation of that he shoots his wit.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke Senior of Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 5, sc. 4.
  • ''They are as sick that surfeit with too much as they that starve with nothing. It is no mean happiness therefore to be seated in the mean.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Nerissa, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 2, l. 5-8. "In the mean" means between extremes of too much and too little.
  • ''I cannot be a man with wishing, therefore I will die a woman with grieving.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 322-3. Addressing Benedick, in the hope of persuading him to challenge Claudio.
  • ''There was never yet fair woman but she made mouths in a glass.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fool, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 2, l. 35-6.
  • ''Reputation is an idle and most false imposition; oft got without merit, and lost without deserving.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3, l. 268-70. "Imposition" means what is attributed to someone by other people.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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