Alfred Lord Tennyson

(6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892 / Lincoln / England)

Alfred Lord Tennyson Poems

1. The Blackbird -new- 7/2/2015
2. Hark! The Dogs Howl! 3/19/2015
3. Love and Sorrow 5/4/2015
4. The Sailor Boy 1/10/2015
5. The Two Voices 2/9/2015
6. Lullaby 1/6/2015
7. The Tears Of Heaven 3/16/2015
8. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 95. By Night We Linger'D On The Lawn 1/1/2004
9. Œnone 4/8/2010
10. Northern Farmer: New Style 1/1/2004
11. In Memoriam A. H. H.: Preface 4/8/2010
12. Obiit Mdcccxxxiii (Entire) 4/8/2010
13. The Princess (Part 7) 1/1/2004
14. Beauty 11/27/2014
15. In The Garden At Swainston 4/8/2010
16. Recollection Of The Arabian Nights 1/1/2004
17. Lxxxiii: Spring 4/8/2010
18. Hands All Round 4/8/2010
19. Gigantic Daughter Of The West, 4/8/2010
20. In Memoriam A. H. H. 116 4/8/2010
21. In Memoriam A. H. H. 7 4/8/2010
22. Idylls Of The King: The Last Tournament (Excerpt) 1/1/2004
23. O True And Tried 4/8/2010
24. Milton (Alcaics) 1/1/2004
25. The Last Tournament 4/8/2010
26. The Progress Of Spring 1/1/2004
27. Pelleas And Ettarre 1/1/2004
28. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 50. Be Near Me When My Light Is Low 2/16/2015
29. Lilian 1/1/2004
30. The Talking Oak 1/1/2004
31. The Lord Of Burleigh 1/1/2004
32. Sir Launcelot And Queen Guinevere 4/8/2010
33. The Princess: A Medley: Our Enemies Have Fall'N 1/1/2004
34. The Mermaid 4/8/2010
35. The Princess (Part 4) 1/1/2004
36. The Princess: A Medley: Come Down, O Maid 1/1/2004
37. Of Old Sat Freedom On The Heights 1/1/2004
38. The Defence Of Lucknow 4/8/2010
39. The Princess (Part 6) 1/1/2004
40. The Princess (Part 3) 1/1/2004
Best Poem of Alfred Lord Tennyson

Ulysses

It little profits that an idle king,
By this still hearth, among these barren crags,
Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole
Unequal laws unto a savage race,
That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
I cannot rest from travel; I will drink
Life to the lees. All times I have enjoy'd
Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those
That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when
Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades
Vext the dim sea. I am become a name;
For always roaming with a hungry heart
Much have I seen and known,-- cities of men ...

Read the full of Ulysses

Merlin And Vivien

A storm was coming, but the winds were still,
And in the wild woods of Broceliande,
Before an oak, so hollow, huge and old
It looked a tower of ivied masonwork,
At Merlin's feet the wily Vivien lay.

For he that always bare in bitter grudge
The slights of Arthur and his Table, Mark
The Cornish King, had heard a wandering voice,

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