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(6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892 / Lincoln / England)

Comments about Alfred Lord Tennyson

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  • Qadr Amir (12/21/2013 10:26:00 AM)

    To Bernie Tennyson: I feel honored to talk with you as Alfred Lord Tennyson is one of my favorite poets. I recommend you IN MEMORIAM as it kind a fits with your situation. It is a requiem for the poet's beloved Cambridge friend Arthur Henry Hallam, who died suddenly of a cerebral haemorrhage in Vienna in 1833.

    28 person liked.
    18 person did not like.
  • Bernie Tennyson (6/26/2013 8:10:00 PM)

    I recently looked into my Family Tree as sadly my Father passed away January last gone at 56yrs young! ! My mam sadly passed 5yrs before at the age of 52yrs young. I myself is 33 years of age. I have discovered that Alfred Lord Tennyson is one of my Ancestors. My father used to write poems as a hobbie but he was great at it. I now cant stop reading his work and think its fantastic. Could anyone suggest a poem to me that i can dedicate to both my parents please. I miss them so much and would like to get it printed and framed. I have yet to read loads more, any suggestions? ? Thank you for taking the time to read this comment.

  • Julia Sawyer (6/26/2013 12:28:00 PM)

    There was a poem called To Julia on Her birthday unpublished by Alfred Lord Tennyson, I took it to Sotheby's to be sold in the70's along with other poems written by Tennysons own hand they said that it was not valuable enough, but they wouldn't return it to me, over the years I have requested it back but have had no reply from them, has anyone heard of it I believe he is referring to Julia Cameron who was the famous photographer during Tennyson's time

  • Woofwoof Ray (4/18/2013 7:06:00 AM)

    His poems are fantastic. My favourites are Break break break, Now sleeps the crimson petal (great version of this set to music in the film Vanity fair with Reese Witherspoon) , Come into the garden maud, The lady of Shallott, Crossing the bar

  • Woofwoof Ray (4/18/2013 7:05:00 AM)

    His poems are fantastic. My favourites are Break break break, Now sleeps the crimson petal (great version of this set to music in the film Vanity fair with Reese Witherspoon) , Come into the garden maud, The lady of Shallott, Crossing the bar

  • Eric Lopez (3/10/2013 11:07:00 PM)

    I was playing a video game Mass Effect, and through out the series Shepherd, and Williamson use references from Tennyson's poems. I decided to look him up and they are just amazing. I'm glad Mass effect turned me on to this guy's amazing art work.

  • Ulysses J (11/5/2012 7:46:00 PM)

    In Memoriam is pure beauty
    And I guess it's evident that I'm a fan of Ulysses, heh, mostly because I can relate well to Ulysses, flaws and all I respect the character in that poem so much, in fact it's hard to express and i get all teary when i try; _;

  • Artemis Gutierrez (9/12/2012 6:06:00 PM)

    I like his poem charge of the light brigade. For my report I wrote about this poem and Alfred Lord Tennyson.

  • Namrata Nath (8/26/2012 3:29:00 AM)

    alfred lord tennyson is a great poet. I just read The brook. It's so mesmerising the way he uses the words and sounds and everything. Please check out the poem guys. It's totally out of the world! ! !

  • Kevin Straw (6/4/2012 1:33:00 PM)

    “crookéd hands” (2 syllables) is wrong.
    “The man clasped his stick with crookéd hands.” implies hands out of shape.
    But an eagle’s “feet” are flexible to curve and have long curved claws at the end. Tennyson presumably had not seen an eagle’s feet.
    I would not say that an eagle on a mountain is “close to the sun”.
    I am not sure about “from his mountain walls” – the eagle is watching from a crag – what is the point of “walls”? “his mountain wall” would be a better metaphor denoting the perpendicularity of the crag which allows the eagle to fall “like a thunderbolt”. But the rhyme would be lost.
    Can anyone tell me if this method of hunting is used by eagles? Do they not hunt by flying and then stooping on their prey?
    The poet is trying to anthropomorphise the eagle but he does not help the poem by doing so.
    Calling the eagle “he” and giving it “hands” etc. deprives it of its savage nature reminding one of Wind in the Willows!
    But the overall rhetorical power of the poem cannot be denied.

The Grandmother

I.
And Willy, my eldest-born, is gone, you say, little Anne?
Ruddy and white, and strong on his legs, he looks like a man.
And Willy's wife has written: she never was over-wise,
Never the wife for Willy: he would n't take my advice.

II.
For, Annie, you see, her father was not the man to save,
Had n't a head to manage, and drank himself into his grave.

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