Richard Aldington

(8 July 1892 – 27 July 1962 / Portsmouth, Hampshire)

Richard Aldington
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born Edward Godfree Aldington, was an English writer and poet. Aldington was best known for his World War I poetry, the 1929 novel, Death of a Hero, and the controversy arising from his 1955 Lawrence of Arabia: A Biographical Inquiry. His 1946 biography, Wellington, was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize.

Aldington, christened Edward Godfree, was born at Portsmouth, Hampshire, England, on July 8, 1892. At an early age, he moved with his mother, Jesse May, and father, middle-class lawer Albert Edward Aldington, to Dover. There he grew up with his sister Margery and attended preparatory schools, after which he studied for four years at Dover College.

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  • Patriotism is a lively sense of collective responsibility. Nationalism is a silly cock crowing on its own dunghill and calling for larger spurs and brighter beaks. I fear that nationalism is one of En...
    Richard Aldington (1892-1962), British author. Purfleet, in The Colonel's Daughter, pt. 1, ch. 6 (1931).
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Comments about Richard Aldington

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  • Rookie - 183 Points Koena Mokoena (11/14/2011 4:45:00 AM)

    Hey yo! i want a clarification regarding your poem named ' Round-Pond '. Your correspondence will be highly appreciated.

    Have a nice day!

    Mr. Koena France Mokoena
    Country: South Africa
    Website: www.poemhunter.com/kfmproductions

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Best Poem of Richard Aldington

Bombardment

Four days the earth was rent and torn
By bursting steel,
The houses fell about us;
Three nights we dared not sleep,
Sweating, and listening for the imminent crash
Which meant our death.

The fourth night every man,
Nerve-tortured, racked to exhaustion,
Slept, muttering and twitching,
While the shells crashed overhead.

The fifth day there came a hush;
We left our holes
And looked above the wreckage of the earth
To where the white clouds moved in silent lines
Across the untroubled blue.

Read the full of Bombardment

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