City Poems - Poems For City

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Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 - Poem by William Wordsworth

Earth has not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sight so touching in its majesty:
This City now doth, like a garment, wear
The beauty of the morning; silent, bare,
Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie
Open unto the fields, and to the sky;
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Never did sun more beautifully steep
In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill;
Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!
The river glideth at his own sweet will:
Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!

Comments about Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 by William Wordsworth

  • Rookie Andrew Hoellering (4/28/2009 11:15:00 PM)

    The sonnet’s octave is a minute description of the early morning scene that unfolds before the poet’s eyes; the sestet his reflections on the impact of what is being described. Because of its graphic details the poem manages to be both objective and personal; meaning it is both visually vivid and true to Wordsworth’s feelings, which he enables us to share.
    As in all great poetry, the soundscape is vital and it is clearly written to be read aloud. The opening three and last two lines describe the impact of the scene; the rest picture in detail on what the poet’s feeling response is based.
    We are forced to stress ‘Open’(line seven) which is implicitly opposed to concealed; what you see is what you get, and the dancing vowel sounds in ‘ all bright and glittering in the smokeless air’ confirm Wordsworth’s delight in the scene he is silently witnessing. The simile ‘like a garment’ is likewise brilliant, suggesting the closeness of the beauty he describes both to the city and the morning.
    The repetition of ‘never’and ‘n’er’ again emphasises that impact, and the line, ‘Dear God, the very houses seem asleep’ is an exclamation that seems to escape the poet despite himself.
    The last line, ‘And all that mighty heart is lying still’ is again tremendous, for we know the city will be waking up shortly and pulsing into life.

    8.6/10? You must be joking! (Report) Reply

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Poems About City

  1. 1. Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, Septem.. , William Wordsworth
  2. 2. The City's Love , Claude McKay
  3. 3. And The City Stood In Its Brightness , Czeslaw Milosz
  4. 4. California Plush , Frank Bidart
  5. 5. Block City , Robert Louis Stevenson
  6. 6. In A Station Of The Metro , Ezra Pound
  7. 7. He Dreams Of Falling , Ruth Ellen Kocher
  8. 8. London , William Blake
  9. 9. Song Of The City At Night , Carol Frost
  10. 10. The City Limits , Archie Randolph Ammons
  11. 11. With My Back To City Hall, On Yom Kippur , Jordan Davis
  12. 12. City Without A Name , Czeslaw Milosz
  13. 13. His Return To London , Robert Herrick
  14. 14. Tale Of Two Cities , Mark Jarman
  15. 15. This City , Liam Rector
  16. 16. Up At A Villa--Down In The City , Robert Browning
  17. 17. The City (1925) , Carl Rakosi
  18. 18. The Chicago Poem , Jerome Rothenberg
  19. 19. Our Happiness , Eileen Myles
  20. 20. Location La , Martha Ronk
  21. 21. From Book I, Paterson , William Carlos Williams
  22. 22. Of Being Numerous , George Oppen
  23. 23. Above The City , James Laughlin
  24. 24. Cairo Jag , Keith Douglas
  25. 25. Siege Of Vienna Raised By John Sobieski , William Wordsworth
  26. 26. I Listen To Istanbul , Orhan Veli Kanik
  27. 27. To Sydney , Robert Louis Stevenson
  28. 28. Raschi In Prague , Emma Lazarus
  29. 29. Moscow,1928 , Leo Yankevich
  30. 30. Breitmann In Holland. Amsterdam. , Charles Godfrey Leland
  31. 31. Rome , Ezra Pound
  32. 32. Paris In Spring , Sara Teasdale
  33. 33. Barcelona , Robert William Service
  34. 34. New York At Night , Amy Lowell
  35. 35. Songs To Berlin , Alfred Lichtenstein
  36. 36. London, 1802 , William Wordsworth
  37. 37. Venice , Boris Pasternak
  38. 38. Roses In Madrid , Isabella Valancy Crawford
  39. 39. The Beautiful City Of Perth , William Topaz McGonagall
  40. 40. Young In New Orleans , Charles Bukowski
  41. 41. Crossing Geneva Marsh , Leo Yankevich
  42. 42. The Last Pieta, In Florence , James Arlington Wright
  43. 43. With Scindia To Delhi , Rudyard Kipling
  44. 44. Dover To Munich , Charles Stuart Calverley
  45. 45. A Meeting In Copenhagen , Yevgeny Yevtushenko
  46. 46. Of Brussels—it Was Not , Emily Dickinson
  47. 47. Ballad Of Birmingham , Dudley Randall
  48. 48. Belfast Tune , Joseph Brodsky
  49. 49. Shanghaied , Harry Kemp
  50. 50. Trieste - Zagreb (- Budapest) , Slobodan Nikolic
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