Edwin Cordero


What to Tell?


Don't say when I cannot prevail;
Life's a grimly-told tale,
And none of us it favors well.
From the nothingness, which we hail,
To having eyes open, wails,
What more is here to tell?

Submitted: Sunday, January 05, 2014
Edited: Monday, January 06, 2014

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  • Rookie - 49 Points Edwin Cordero (1/5/2014 9:34:00 AM)

    Those second three lines should be fun to explain. They are meant to be ambiguous in meaning. Imagine a birth; a baby comes from apparent nothingness, wails, and the speaker insinuates that wailing is all we do here, in life. Almost a joke! Now, the second possible interpretation relates to the way humans come to view their existence overall. Hail is the keyword. The speaker states that we hail from nothingness, and, if we read it again, nothingness we hail. What is it that humans hail in life? The deities of religion. So, it is possible that the speaker is also insinuating disbelief in religion as a whole. Now, what about those lines about eyes open and such? The speaker may be referring to how some humans come to understand that religious belief is a fairytale, how their eyes open to reality, and, sadly, how the pain of it makes them wail, as well. From this interpretative stance, it could be understood as an atheist poem, but not necessarily a pretentious attack upon religion. It is more a sad acceptance of what is perceived as the reality of life. Overall, no matter which interpretation you select, it is meant for readers to reach the conclusion that the speaker wants to move on, despite the pain in life and the negativity of others. Don't tell me when I cannot prevail! We are going to suffer, anyway! Thank you reading, and I truly appreciate your feedback. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 255 Points Stephen W (1/5/2014 8:22:00 AM)

    Like this a lot. Not quite sure what the second three lines mean, though. (Report) Reply

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