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Richard Lovelace

(1618-1657 / London / England)

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To Lucasta, Going To The Wars


Tell me not (Sweet) I am unkind,
That from the nunnery
Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind
To war and arms I fly.

True, a new mistress now I chase,
The first foe in the field;
And with a stronger faith embrace
A sword, a horse, a shield.

Yet this inconstancy is such
As you too shall adore;
I could not love thee (Dear) so much,
Lov'd I not Honour more.

Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002

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Read poems about / on: horse, faith, war, love

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  • Rookie - 274 Points Sossi Khachadourian (12/18/2014 5:06:00 AM)

    Tell me not (Sweet) I am unkind,
    That from the nunnery
    Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind
    To war and arms I fly. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Ian Fraser (12/20/2011 5:36:00 AM)

    Lovelace was a Cavalier (Royalist supporter) during the English Civil War, though it is unlikely he actually fought in it, having been placed under an embargo by Parliament for his previous Royalist activities. The poem nowadays seems rather quaint, though the last two lines are probably his most often quoted. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 294 Points Ramesh T A (12/18/2009 7:27:00 AM)

    The tempo of poem quite reveals the urgency of matter under consideration! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Frieda Werden (12/18/2005 1:21:00 PM)

    The first line and the last two lines of this poem are probably all in Barlett's, they are so emblematic of the custom wrapped round the patriarchal theft of males from females.

    What I like most about this is the sudden pairing of an amphibrach foot with an anapest (second line of the second verse) in what is mainly an iambic dawdle. (Report) Reply

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