William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Ci - Poem by William Shakespeare

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?
Excuse not silence so; for't lies in thee
To make him much outlive a gilded tomb,
And to be praised of ages yet to be.
Then do thy office, Muse; I teach thee how
To make him seem long hence as he shows now.

Comments about Sonnet Ci by William Shakespeare

  • Gold Star - 69,158 Points Fabrizio Frosini (11/7/2015 10:20:00 AM)

    The Muse is rebuked for neglecting the poet's friend. But the answer is suggested that the friend needs no eulogy. Truth expresses herself in the colour of his countenance, and true beauty requires no pictorial embellishment. Description and adornment would vitiate and adulterate what is pre-eminently excellent. Still, the Muse must not decline the suggested task; for it is her privilege to confer long-enduring renown. (Report) Reply

    2 person liked.
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  • Rookie - 184 Points Brian Jani (4/26/2014 9:14:00 AM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 36,928 Points * Sunprincess * (12/26/2013 12:56:00 AM)

    ...........deep thoughts on truth and beauty...enjoyed... (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: truth, beauty, silence, sonnet

Poem Submitted: Friday, May 18, 2001

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