William Ernest Henley

(1849 - 1902 / Gloucester / England)

Madam Life's A Piece In Bloom - Poem by William Ernest Henley

Madam Life's a piece in bloom
Death goes dogging everywhere:
She's the tenant of the room,
He's the ruffian on the stair.

You shall see her as a friend,
You shall bilk him once or twice;
But he'll trap you in the end,
And he'll stick you for her price.

With his kneebones at your chest,
And his knuckles in your throat,
You would reason -- plead -- protest!
Clutching at her petticoat;

But she's heard it all before,
Well she knows you've had your fun,
Gingerly she gains the door,
And your little job is done.


Comments about Madam Life's A Piece In Bloom by William Ernest Henley

  • Rookie - 169 Points Brian Jani (5/5/2014 4:32:00 AM)

    Nice use if words Mr ernest (Report) Reply

    0 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • Rookie - 0 Points Topaz Antony (6/9/2013 4:25:00 PM)

    A visual poem. One can picture this in stages. The awareness of the rotten underbelly of Victorian life is immense. This poem deserves more appreciation. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Alison Smith (7/12/2005 2:22:00 PM)

    A great take on life and death by the original Long John Silver (Report) Reply

Read all 3 comments »



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Read poems about / on: fun, friend, death, life, dog



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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