Edward Dowden

(3 May 1843 - 4 April 1913 / Co. Cork / Ireland)

In The Garden I: The Garden - Poem by Edward Dowden

PAST the town's clamour is a garden full
Of loneness and old greenery; at noon
When birds are hush'd, save one dim cushat's croon,
A ripen'd silence hangs beneath the cool
Great branches; basking roses dream and drop
A petal, and dream still; and summer's boon
Of mellow grasses, to be levell'd soon
By a dew-drenched scythe, will hardly stop
At the uprunning mounds of chestnut trees.
Still let me muse in this rich haunt by day,
And know all night in dusky placidness
It lies beneath the summer, while great ease
Broods in the leaves, and every light wind's stress
Lifts a faint odour down the verdurous way.

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Read poems about / on: summer, dream, silence, wind, light, night, rose, tree

Poem Submitted: Thursday, January 1, 2004

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