Samuel Johnson

(1709 - 1784 / Lichfield / England)

From Boethius: De Consolatione Philosophiae; Book III. Metre 5


The man who pants for ample sway,
Must bid his passions all obey;
Must bid each wild desire be still,
Nor yoke his reason with his will:
For though beneath thy haughty brow
Warm India's supple sons should bow,
Though northern climes confess thy sway,
Which erst in frost and freedom lay,
If Sorrow pine, or Avarice crave,
Bow down and own thyself a slave.

Submitted: Wednesday, April 07, 2010

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