Treasure Island

Samuel Johnson

(1709 - 1784 / Lichfield / England)

Quotations

  • ''Talking of our feeling for the distresses of others;MJOHNSON. "Why, Sir, there is much noise made about it, but it is greatly exaggerated.... BOSWELL. "But suppose now, Sir, that one of your intimate friends were apprehended for an offence for which he might be hanged." JOHNSON. "I should do what I could to bail him, and give him any other assistance; but if he were once fairly hanged, I would not suffer.... Sir, that sympathetic feeling goes a very little way in depressing the mind."''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. (Originally published 1791). Boswell's Life of Johnson, Oct. 18, 1769, pp. 416-17, Oxford University Press (1980).
    6 person liked.
    8 person did not like.
  • ''Melancholy, indeed, should be diverted by every means but drinking.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, March 28, 1776 (1791).
  • ''Curiosity is one of the most permanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous intellect.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 4, eds. W.J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (1969). Rambler (London, March 1751), no. 103.
  • ''What is the reason that women servants ... have much lower wages than men servants ... when in fact our female house servants work much harder than the male?''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. (Originally published 1791). Boswell's Life of Johnson, April 13, 1773, p. 513, Oxford University Press (1980).
  • ''The happiest conversation is that of which nothing is distinctly remembered but a general effect of pleasing impression.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, entry for 1781 (1791).
  • ''The natural flights of the human mind are not from pleasure to pleasure, but from hope to hope.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 3, eds. W.J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (1969). Rambler (London, March 24, 1750), no. 2.
  • ''Patriotism having become one of our topicks, Johnson suddenly uttered, in a strong determined tone, an apophthegm, at which many will start: "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel." But let it be considered that he did not mean a real and generous love of our country, but that pretended patriotism which so many, in all ages and countries, have made a cloak of self-interest.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. (Originally published 1791). Boswell's Life of Johnson, April 7, 1775, p. 615, Oxford University Press (1980).
  • ''Lawyers know life practically. A bookish man should always have them to converse with.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Said to the lawyer Oliver Edwards. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 17, 1778 (1791).
  • ''That observation which is called knowledge of the world will be found much more frequently to make men cunning than good.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 3, eds. W.J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (1969). Rambler (London, March 31, 1750), no. 4.
  • ''As we walked along the Strand to-night, arm in arm, a woman of the town accosted us, in the usual enticing manner. "No, no, my girl, (said Johnson) it won't do."''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. (Originally published 1791). Boswell's Life of Johnson, July 30, 1763, p. 323, Oxford University Press (1980). Boswell and Johnson on an evening stroll.

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Anacreon: Ode 9

Lovely courier of the sky,
Whence and whither dost thou fly?
Scattering, as thy pinions play,
Liquid fragrance all the way:
Is it business? is it love?
Tell me, tell me, gentle dove.
'Soft Anacreon's vows I bear,
Vows to Myrtale the fair;
Graced with all that charms the heart,

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