Thomas Randolph

(1605-1635 / England)

Fairy Song


We the fairies blithe and antic,
Of Dimensions not gigantic,
Though the moonshine mostly keep us,
Oft in orchards frisk and peep us,

Stolen sweets are always sweeter;
Stolen kisses much completer;
Stolen looks are nice in chapels;
Stolen, stolen be your apples.

When to bed the world are bobbing,
Then's the time to go orchard robbing;
Yet the fruit were scarce worth peeling
Were it not for stealing, stealing.

Submitted: Friday, January 03, 2003

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Comments about this poem (Fairy Song by Thomas Randolph )

  • Rookie Gerry Skinner (12/2/2008 9:49:00 AM)

    I believe that this is not the original by Randolph but a translation by James Leigh Hunt of a Latin poem by Randolph. The constraints of translation may explain the uncomfortable first verse, somewhat reminiscent of William Topaz McGonagall.

    Does anyone have the original? (Report) Reply

Read all 1 comments »

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