Charles Lamb

(10 February 1775 – 27 December 1834 / London)

Charles Lamb Poems

1. On The Sight Of Swans In Kensington Gardens 1/1/2004
2. Feigned Courage 4/10/2010
3. Going Into Breeches 4/10/2010
4. Home Delights 4/10/2010
5. Hypochondriacus 4/10/2010
6. Incorrect Speaking 4/10/2010
7. Lines 4/10/2010
8. Lines Addressed From London, To Sara And S.T.C. At Bristol, In The Summer Of 1796 4/10/2010
9. Moderation In Diet 4/10/2010
10. Motes In The Sunbeams 4/10/2010
11. My Birthday 4/10/2010
12. Neatness In Apparel 4/10/2010
13. Nurse Green 4/10/2010
14. Penny Pieces 4/10/2010
15. Prince Dorus 4/10/2010
16. Prologue To Faulkener 4/10/2010
17. Queen Oriana's Dream 4/10/2010
18. Repentance And Reconciliation 4/10/2010
19. Song For The C--N 4/10/2010
20. Sonnet 4/10/2010
21. Sonnet To A Friend 4/10/2010
22. Sonnet To Mathew Wood, Esq., Alderman And M. P. 4/10/2010
23. Lines Suggested By A Sight Of Waltham Cross 4/10/2010
24. On Being Asked To Write In Miss Westwood's Album 4/10/2010
25. The Ape 4/10/2010
26. The Beasts In The Tower 4/10/2010
27. The Boy And The Skylark 4/10/2010
28. The Broken Doll 4/10/2010
29. The Brother's Reply 4/10/2010
30. The Butterfly 4/10/2010
31. The Coffee Slips 4/10/2010
32. The Confidant 4/10/2010
33. The End Of May 4/10/2010
34. The Force Of Habit 4/10/2010
35. The Godlike 4/10/2010
36. The Great Grandfather 4/10/2010
37. The First Leaf Of Spring 4/10/2010
38. The Magpie's Nest, Or A Lesson Of Docility 4/10/2010
39. The Mimic Harlequin 4/10/2010
40. The Rook And The Sparrows 4/10/2010
Best Poem of Charles Lamb

Anger

Anger in its time and place
May assume a kind of grace.
It must have some reason in it,
And not last beyond a minute.
If to further lengths it go,
It does into malice grow.
'Tis the difference that we see
'Twixt the serpent and the bee.
If the latter you provoke,
It inflicts a hasty stroke,
Puts you to some little pain,
But it never stings again.
Close in tufted bush or brake
Lurks the poison-swellëd snake
Nursing up his cherished wrath;
In the purlieux of his path,
In the cold, or in the warm,
Mean him good, or mean him harm,
Whensoever ...

Read the full of Anger

The Old Familiar Faces

I HAVE had playmates, I have had companions,
In my days of childhood, in my joyful school-days--
All, all are gone, the old familiar faces.

I have been laughing, I have been carousing,
Drinking late, sitting late, with my bosom cronies--
All, all are gone, the old familiar faces.

I loved a Love once, fairest among women:

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