Charles Lamb

(10 February 1775 – 27 December 1834 / London)

Charles Lamb Poems

1. Prince Dorus 4/10/2010
2. The Young Letter Writer 4/10/2010
3. My Birthday 4/10/2010
4. Prologue To Faulkener 4/10/2010
5. The Beasts In The Tower 4/10/2010
6. To Margaret W------ 4/10/2010
7. Which Is The Favourite? 4/10/2010
8. The Three Friends 4/10/2010
9. Time Spent In Dress 4/10/2010
10. Weeding 4/10/2010
11. What Is Fancy? 4/10/2010
12. Written In The First Leaf Of A Child's Memorandum-Book 4/10/2010
13. To Charles Lloyd: An Unexpected Visitor 4/10/2010
14. Written Soon After The Preceding Poem 4/10/2010
15. The Butterfly 4/10/2010
16. The End Of May 4/10/2010
17. Lines Addressed From London, To Sara And S.T.C. At Bristol, In The Summer Of 1796 4/10/2010
18. Lines Suggested By A Sight Of Waltham Cross 4/10/2010
19. Home Delights 4/10/2010
20. To T.L.H. 4/10/2010
21. The Two Bees 4/10/2010
22. The Two Boys 4/10/2010
23. The Confidant 4/10/2010
24. Why Not Do It, Sir, Today? 4/10/2010
25. The Coffee Slips 4/10/2010
26. The First Leaf Of Spring 4/10/2010
27. Incorrect Speaking 4/10/2010
28. On A Late Impiric Of Balmy Memory 4/10/2010
29. Written A Year After The Events 4/10/2010
30. Written Christmas Day 1797 4/10/2010
31. To A Young Lady, On Being Too Fond Of Music 4/10/2010
32. To A River In Which A Child Was Drowned 4/10/2010
33. On Being Asked To Write In Miss Westwood's Album 4/10/2010
34. Lines 4/10/2010
35. To The Poet Cowper, On His Recovery From An Indisposition 4/10/2010
36. To Charles Lloyd 4/10/2010
37. The Mimic Harlequin 4/10/2010
38. The Rook And The Sparrows 4/10/2010
39. The Sparrow And The Hen 4/10/2010
40. Motes In The Sunbeams 4/10/2010
Best Poem of Charles Lamb

A Vision Of Repentance

I saw a famous fountain, in my dream,
Where shady path-ways to a valley led;
A weeping willow lay upon that stream,
And all around the fountain brink were spread
Wide branching trees, with dark green leaf rich clad,
Forming a doubtful twilight-desolate and sad.


The place was such, that whoso enter'd in,
Disrobed was of every earthly thought,
And straight became as one that knew not sin,
Or to the world's first innocence was brought;
Enseem'd it now, he stood on holy ground,
In sweet and tender melancholy wrapt around.


A most strange calm ...

Read the full of A Vision Of Repentance

A Ballad

In a costly palace Youth goes clad in gold;
In a wretched workhouse Age's limbs are cold:
There they sit, the old men by a shivering fire,
Still close and closer cowering, warmth is their desire.

In a costly palace, when the brave gallants dine,
They have store of good venison, with old canary wine,
With singing and music to heighten the cheer;
Coarse bits, with grudging, are the pauper's best fare.

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