Archibald Lampman

(17 November 1861 - 10 February 1899 / Morpeth, Ontario)

Archibald Lampman Poems

1. The Return Of The Year 4/8/2010
2. Good Speech 4/8/2010
3. June 4/8/2010
4. Comfort 4/8/2010
5. Love-Doubt 4/8/2010
6. March 4/8/2010
7. Love-Wonder 4/8/2010
8. The Cup Of Life 4/8/2010
9. Despondency 4/8/2010
10. Easter Eve 4/8/2010
11. The Monk 4/8/2010
12. The King's Sabbath 4/8/2010
13. In October 4/8/2010
14. The Poet's Song 4/8/2010
15. The Poet's Possession 4/8/2010
16. The Coming Of Winter 4/8/2010
17. Freedom 4/8/2010
18. Gentleness 4/8/2010
19. At The Ferry 4/8/2010
20. Winter 4/8/2010
21. Winter-Thought 4/8/2010
22. In March 4/8/2010
23. In Beechwood Cemetery 1/1/2004
24. Lament Of The Winds 4/8/2010
25. Midsummer Night 4/8/2010
26. War 4/8/2010
27. Favorites Of Pan 4/8/2010
28. Deeds 4/8/2010
29. Before Sleep 4/8/2010
30. Between The Rapids 4/8/2010
31. Autumn Maples 4/8/2010
32. The Song Of Pan 4/8/2010
33. The City (2) 4/8/2010
34. With The Night 4/8/2010
35. Chione 4/8/2010
36. In May 4/8/2010
37. The Three Pilgrims 4/8/2010
38. What Do Poets Want With Gold? 4/8/2010
39. The Islet And The Palm 4/8/2010
40. One Day 4/8/2010
Best Poem of Archibald Lampman

A Thunderstorm

A moment the wild swallows like a flight
Of withered gust-caught leaves, serenely high,
Toss in the windrack up the muttering sky.
The leaves hang still. Above the weird twilight,
The hurrying centres of the storm unite
And spreading with huge trunk and rolling fringe,
Each wheeled upon its own tremendous hinge,
Tower darkening on. And now from heaven's height,
With the long roar of elm-trees swept and swayed,
And pelted waters, on the vanished plain
Plunges the blast. Behind the wild white flash
That splits abroad the pealing ...

Read the full of A Thunderstorm

Temagami

Far in the grim Northwest beyond the lines
That turn the rivers eastward to the sea,
Set with a thousand islands, crowned with pines,
Lies the deep water, wild Temagami:
Wild for the hunter's roving, and the use
Of trappers in its dark and trackless vales,
Wild with the trampling of the giant moose,
And the weird magic of old Indian tales.
All day with steady paddles toward the west

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