Treasure Island

Jane Austen

(16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817 / Hampshire, England)

My Dearest Frank, I Wish You Joy


My dearest Frank, I wish you joy
Of Mary's safety with a Boy,
Whose birth has given little pain
Compared with that of Mary Jane.--
May he a growing Blessing prove,
And well deserve his Parents' Love!--
Endow'd with Art's and Nature's Good,
Thy Name possessing with thy Blood,
In him, in all his ways, may we
Another Francis WIlliam see!--
Thy infant days may he inherit,
THey warmth, nay insolence of spirit;--
We would not with one foult dispense
To weaken the resemblance.
May he revive thy Nursery sin,
Peeping as daringly within,
His curley Locks but just descried,
With 'Bet, my be not come to bide.'--
Fearless of danger, braving pain,
And threaten'd very oft in vain,
Still may one Terror daunt his Soul,
One needful engine of Controul
Be found in this sublime array,
A neigbouring Donkey's aweful Bray.
So may his equal faults as Child,
Produce Maturity as mild!
His saucy words and fiery ways
In early Childhood's pettish days,
In Manhood, shew his Father's mind
Like him, considerate and Kind;
All Gentleness to those around,
And anger only not to wound.
Then like his Father too, he must,
To his own former struggles just,
Feel his Deserts with honest Glow,
And all his self-improvement know.
A native fault may thus give birth
To the best blessing, conscious Worth.
As for ourselves we're very well;
As unaffected prose will tell.--
Cassandra's pen will paint our state,
The many comforts that await
Our Chawton home, how much we find
Already in it, to our mind;
And how convinced, that when complete
It will all other Houses beat
The ever have been made or mended,
With rooms concise, or rooms distended.
You'll find us very snug next year,
Perhaps with Charles and Fanny near,
For now it often does delight us
To fancy them just over-right us.--

Submitted: Friday, January 03, 2003

Do you like this poem?
2 person liked.
1 person did not like.

What do you think this poem is about?



Read poems about / on: birth, father, childhood, anger, pain, nature, joy, child, home, children, wind

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (My Dearest Frank, I Wish You Joy by Jane Austen )

Enter the verification code :

  • Alex Battis (2/23/2007 9:02:00 PM)

    Hi, I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on this poem, (what she really means, her tone compared to her other poems, and so on...) Any comments? Please email me at black-roses17@hotmail.com (Report) Reply

Read all 1 comments »

PoemHunter.com Updates

New Poems

  1. Sips through lips, Aftab Alam
  2. The Mature Woman 2, Tex T Sarnie
  3. Invitation for Re - Opening Ceremony!, sisirachandra vaduge
  4. Unbarreled Gun, Edwin Cordero
  5. Thread of thought, Roann Mendriq
  6. Baking Bread, Roann Mendriq
  7. Completion, White Lily
  8. Tears, Michael McParland
  9. Spin of a coin, Tribhawan Kaul
  10. Knowing Fragments, RoseAnn V. Shawiak

Poem of the Day

poet Geoffrey Chaucer

The firste stock-father of gentleness,
What man desireth gentle for to be,
Must follow his trace, and all his wittes dress,
Virtue to love, and vices for to flee;
...... Read complete »

   

Trending Poems

  1. 04 Tongues Made Of Glass, Shaun Shane
  2. Still I Rise, Maya Angelou
  3. The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost
  4. Daffodils, William Wordsworth
  5. Annabel Lee, Edgar Allan Poe
  6. Invictus, William Ernest Henley
  7. Tears, Michael McParland
  8. If, Rudyard Kipling
  9. Television, Roald Dahl
  10. A Ballad of Gentleness, Geoffrey Chaucer

Trending Poets

[Hata Bildir]