Treasure Island

Sir Walter Scott

(1771-1832 / Edinburgh / Scotland)

Lochinvar


O young Lochinvar is come out of the west,
Through all the wide Border his steed was the best;
And save his good broadsword he weapons had none,
He rode all unarm'd, and he rode all alone.
So faithful in love, and so dauntless in war,
There never was knight like the young Lochinvar.
He staid not for brake, and he stopp'd not for stone,
He swam the Eske river where ford there was none;
But ere he alighted at Netherby gate,
The bride had consented, the gallant came late:
For a laggard in love, and a dastard in war,
Was to wed the fair Ellen of brave Lochinvar.

So boldly he enter'd the Netherby Hall,
Among bride's-men, and kinsmen, and brothers and all:
Then spoke the bride's father, his hand on his sword,
(For the poor craven bridegroom said never a word,)
"O come ye in peace here, or come ye in war,
Or to dance at our bridal, young Lord Lochinvar?"

"I long woo'd your daughter, my suit you denied; --
Love swells like the Solway, but ebbs like its tide --
And now I am come, with this lost love of mine,
To lead but one measure, drink one cup of wine.
There are maidens in Scotland more lovely by far,
That would gladly be bride to the young Lochinvar."

The bride kiss'd the goblet: the knight took it up,
He quaff'd off the wine, and he threw down the cup.
She look'd down to blush, and she look'd up to sigh,
With a smile on her lips and a tear in her eye.
He took her soft hand, ere her mother could bar, --
"Now tread we a measure!" said young Lochinvar.

So stately his form, and so lovely her face,
That never a hall such a gailiard did grace;
While her mother did fret, and her father did fume
And the bridegroom stood dangling his bonnet and plume;
And the bride-maidens whisper'd, "'twere better by far
To have match'd our fair cousin with young Lochinvar."

One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear,
When they reach'd the hall-door, and the charger stood near;
So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung,
So light to the saddle before her he sprung!
"She is won! we are gone, over bank, bush, and scaur;
They'll have fleet steeds that follow," quoth young Lochinvar.

There was mounting 'mong Graemes of the Netherby clan;
Forsters, Fenwicks, and Musgraves, they rode and they ran:
There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lee,
But the lost bride of Netherby ne'er did they see.
So daring in love, and so dauntless in war,
Have ye e'er heard of gallant like young Lochinvar?

Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002

Do you like this poem?
3 person liked.
0 person did not like.

Read poems about / on: war, father, mother, daughter, lost, dance, river, kiss, light, peace, smile, alone, love, wedding, spring, swimming, running

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (Lochinvar by Sir Walter Scott )

Enter the verification code :

  • Krishnakumar Chandrasekar Nair (1/22/2014 9:52:00 AM)

    He was but one
    And only one to ever be
    To gallantly lift from netherby
    A bride as worthy as he..............

    Great unmatched poem of its class. I invite you folks to my page too (Report) Reply

  • Ved Dev (1/22/2009 6:13:00 AM)

    Quote: But the lost bride of Netherby ne'er did they see!

    What happened to her? (Report) Reply

  • Christian Eliab Ratnam (5/19/2005 8:33:00 AM)

    Beautiful poetry is poetry that potrays the most complicated matters in life in as simple and as direct a manner possible. And in this case, Sir Walter Scott has put love by itself in the most courages fashion imaginable. Wonderful work. (Report) Reply

  • John McPartlan (6/10/2004 1:55:00 PM)

    Sir Walter Scott captures for many the essence of true love through the eloped pair. Doubtless, Ellen was coerced into a lesser marriage by her father while being in love with our hero knight. Lochinvar had not wooed sufficiently to win the permission of Ellen's father to wed her. Many a male will sit on the fence and wait to see what might develop. Lochinvar, like many males, is forced to make a choice. Heroically, he decides to kidnap the willing Ellen and escapes to the glens. A salutary lesson for women: men like sitting on fences until they are pushed to jump either way. (Report) Reply

Read all 5 comments »

Top Poems

  1. Phenomenal Woman
    Maya Angelou
  2. The Road Not Taken
    Robert Frost
  3. If You Forget Me
    Pablo Neruda
  4. Still I Rise
    Maya Angelou
  5. Dreams
    Langston Hughes
  6. Annabel Lee
    Edgar Allan Poe
  7. If
    Rudyard Kipling
  8. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    Robert Frost
  9. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
    Maya Angelou
  10. Invictus
    William Ernest Henley

PoemHunter.com Updates

New Poems

  1. Between the lines, Dr PJ Raj Kamal
  2. Common Crow, Prasad Natarajan
  3. Silver Twine, Prasad Natarajan
  4. Concrete Fill, Prasad Natarajan
  5. Sonnet # 512, Luis Estable
  6. In born, hasmukh amathalal
  7. Sonnet # 511, Luis Estable
  8. Point for struggle, hasmukh amathalal
  9. Good lien, hasmukh amathalal
  10. Darkness Surrounds, Shalom Freedman

Poem of the Day

poet Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
...... Read complete »

 

Modern Poem

poet Ernest G Moll

 

Member Poem

[Hata Bildir]