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Lizette Woodworth Reese

(January 9, 1856 – December 17, 1935 / Waverly)

Daffodils


Fathered by March, the daffodils are here.
First, all the air grew keen with yesterday,
And once a thrush from out some hollow gray
On a field’s edge, where whitening stalks made cheer,
Fluted the last unto the budding year;
Now that the wind lets loose from orchard spray
Plum bloom and peach bloom down the dripping way,
Their punctual gold through the wet blades they rear.
Oh, fleet and sweet! A light to all that pass
Below, in the cramped yard, close to the street,
Long-stemmed ones flame behind the palings bare,
The whole of April in a tuft of grass.
Scarce here, soon will it be—oh, sweet and fleet!—
Gone like a snatch of song upon the stair.

Submitted: Saturday, December 17, 2011

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  • Rookie - 0 Points Colleen Courtney (5/19/2014 10:23:00 AM)

    Yes, the daffodils come and show us their beauty for such a short time, but makes us look forward to all the blooms to come! Nice poem. (Report) Reply

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