Rudyard Kipling

(30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936 / Bombay)

A British-Roman Song - Poem by Rudyard Kipling

(A. D. 406)
"A Centurion of the Thirtieth"


My father's father saw it not,
And I, belike, shall never come
To look on that so-holy spot --
That very Rome --

Crowned by all Time, all Art, all Might,
The equal work of Gods and Man,
City beneath whose oldest height --
The Race began!

Soon to send forth again a brood,
Unshakable, we pray, that clings
To Rome's thrice-hammered hardihood --
In arduous things.

Strong heart with triple armour bound,
Beat strongly, for thy life-blood runs,
Age after Age, the Empire round --
In us thy Sons

Who, distant from the Seven Hills,
Loving and serving much, require
Thee -- thee to guard 'gainst home-born ills
The Imperial Fire!


Comments about A British-Roman Song by Rudyard Kipling

  • Rookie - 108 Points Brian Jani (4/28/2014 6:17:00 AM)

    You surely know how to wrote, I like each and every poem of yours (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: father, city, work, fire, home, time, song, heart, life, son, running



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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