Francis William Lauderdale Adams

(27 September 1862 – 4 September 1893)

Francis William Lauderdale Adams Poems

41. Hong-Kong Lyrics 4/20/2010
42. In An East End Hovel 4/20/2010
43. In The Edgware Road 4/20/2010
44. In The Pit 4/20/2010
45. In The Sea-Gardens 4/20/2010
46. In The Street 4/20/2010
47. In Trafalgar Square 4/20/2010
48. Ireland 4/20/2010
49. Jesus 4/20/2010
50. Labour — Capital — Land 4/20/2010
51. Liberty! 4/20/2010
52. London 4/20/2010
53. Lord Leitrim 4/20/2010
54. Love And Death 1/4/2003
55. Move On! 4/20/2010
56. New Guinea 4/20/2010
57. One Among So Many 4/20/2010
58. Parallels For The Pious 4/20/2010
59. Père-La-Chaise 4/20/2010
60. Post-Mortem 4/20/2010
61. Prayer 4/20/2010
62. Proem 4/20/2010
63. Something 1/4/2003
64. Song Of The Dispossessed 4/20/2010
65. The Answer 4/20/2010
66. The Australian Flag 4/20/2010
67. The Caged Eagle 4/20/2010
68. The Fisherman 4/20/2010
69. The Mass Of Christ 4/20/2010
70. The New Locksley Hall 4/20/2010
71. The Outcasts 4/20/2010
72. The Peasants' Revolt 4/20/2010
73. The Truth 4/20/2010
74. To A. L. Gordon 1/4/2003
75. To An Artist 4/20/2010
76. To An Old Friend In England 4/20/2010
77. To Charles Parnell 4/20/2010
78. To England 4/20/2010
79. To His Love 4/20/2010
80. To India 4/20/2010
Best Poem of Francis William Lauderdale Adams

Art

'YES, let Art go, if it must be
That with it men must starve —
If Music, Painting, Poetry
Spring from the wasted hearth!'
Yes, let Art go, till once again
Through fearless heads and hands
The toil of millions and the pain
Be passed from out the lands:
Till from the few their plunder falls
To those who've toiled and earned
But misery's hopeless intervals
From those who've robbed and spurned.
Yes, let Art go, without a fear,
Like Autumn flowers we burn,
For, with her reawakening year,
Be sure she will return! —
Return, but greater, nobler ...

Read the full of Art

Dai Butsu

He sits. Upon the kingly head doth rest
The round-balled wimple, and the heavy rings
Touch on the shoulders where the swallow clings;
The downward garment shows the ambiguous breast;
The Face--that Face one scarce can look on, lest
One learn the secret of unspeakable things;
But the dread gaze descends with shudderings
To the veiled couched knees, the hands and thumbs close-pressed.
O lidded downcast eyes that bear the weight

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