Learn More

Poetics and Poetry Discussion


Post a message
  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (12/2/2005 6:16:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

    I believe it's more important to 'place' a poem than trash it. Ernestine, your comment that you thought it was 'good', thus inviting admiration, put me off from more comment than that 'the four-stress line seems to be the medium for local pride'. It could be - and has often been - in every local newspaper in the world -

    'Little Rock! It's a friendly place
    with a welcome smile on every face!
    There is no better place to be
    than Little Rock for you an' me! '

    It's not 'poetry' but it is 'verse'. And unlike an awful lot of more ambitious verse/poetry, it does what it sets out to do! Derbyshire sentiments expressed, hearts warmed! And poetry back on the school curriculum with Profs. JC and LP as visiting lecturers!

    Replies for this message:
    • Rookie Lori Boulard (12/2/2005 2:51:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

      JC, I disagree. (How's that for a reply.) Public poems as Ernestine's posting are supposed to bring people together, raise some morale in the area, and celebrate the simple and lovely things about th ... more

  • Rookie Herbert Nehrlich1 (12/2/2005 4:07:00 AM) Post reply | Read 4 replies

    To Jake and others:
    It is amazing. History repeats itself on P/H, even though the players are not what historians would consider material worth mentioning.
    Someone is actually going through (as we speak) the tedious process of deleting their cookies and whatever else steps they must take and then giving my poems a one. I can watch it unfold, it takes about the same amount of time each time.
    Perhaps a sweatshop would be good for them, with that much patience and persistence.
    Best
    H

    Replies for this message:
  • Rookie Meredith Creek (12/2/2005 12:16:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    I'm new to the loop here and just submitted some poems on this site. I am not sure what is commonplace on the discussion board, but I hope you guys will fill me in as I go along. Is there a specific place to submit poems other than under 'manage your poems? ' If so let me know. Thanks and have a good weekend. Meredith

    Replies for this message:
    • Rookie Michael Shepherd (12/2/2005 5:06:00 AM) Post reply

      Meredith, the 'correct' procedure is simply to post your poems, and await any comment or rating from the general readership, who are after all the prime audience on this site. If you want a response f ... more

  • Rookie Allan James Saywell (12/1/2005 10:29:00 PM) Post reply

    a poem by timothy macqueeny could the forum help this fellow by dissecting his poem and helping him sort it out, i am a little busy at the moment perhaps carter can take a look and peruse the poem for this young fellow

  • Rookie Allan James Saywell (12/1/2005 10:25:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    Lines: The Drippings from a Golden Umbrella, Collected in Pans and Boiled for Stew


    My body was hovering, time dilating, at the apex of a rollercoaster somewhere
    Buried in my flesh. That feeling drew out that second before the first hill
    And my third eye watched as it drew out to infinite thinness and began to
    Tilt, it’s corners tilting against the motion, swirling into Julia’s writhing arms.
    Twisting in upon itself, the moment became a dragon, tail in mouth
    And my body became a conduit
    One that carries the love of God, the Wa of the Tao into his heart from the infinite
    And discharges its pure energy into
    The surrounding circuits
    I move not such crude electricity, where lurks the work of devils, some say
    But pure oneness, coded in the language of understanding
    I must speak for the slim cold grey figure ‘neath the golden umbrella
    As clouds climb out of my mouth
    And tornadoes flare from my nasal cavity
    In a minute my mind assumes to see the glowing orb
    Yet the hands of time shuffle about like a street corner magician’s, a scam up his sleeve

    I crumble into nudity
    Feeling various cloths attempt to battle their way back upon my body
    I feel the doom, five thousand parsecs from my mind but still right there.
    I give peace and good tidings to all and am returned in kind(ness)
    I revel in their smiling faces, eyes widened by divine realization
    And the love that pours from my heart/mind/soul/capacitors
    Sifting between ill-ordered moments of coherence and it’s lack
    I somehow manage to use my mind
    To indulge myself, perhaps a tad arrogantly, allowing myself to play the sage.
    I see harmonious eyes strike chords with every babbling that exits my face
    And only the ring of understanding remains
    Were there not the years, if only time would dilate through years, one would we be
    And I would not have to bear any shame or malice nor the contempt of those
    Whom I respect.
    So I reach into my purer mind
    And wither into a comfortable neutrality

    It is the next time after the daily descent, the darkness not yet complete at this hour
    My eyes move in different directions at different times
    King Buzzo is whispering in my ear with his lonely bass guitar
    I am fed by wind and smoke
    Tubes of pleasure might tempt my orifices
    But my strength remains
    All is well, I am free to go about my life in this manner
    Welcoming confusion and chaos with the widest open arms and finding order and peace In their reassuring embrace.
    Because the year is new. Because I’ve got all the time in the world.

    In my mind I am climbing a tree and it is tomorrow and it is warm and there is a breeze
    And nary a building between here and the horizon.
    And I know tomorrow will not be like that at all. That scene may never come to pass.
    Yet it is in my heart. And I am content with it’s presence therein, even if it never escapes.

    ...an ocean of time later
    I have no memory.

    Peter Timothy McQueeny

    Replies for this message:
  • Rookie allan james saywell (12/1/2005 6:08:00 PM) Post reply | Read 2 replies

    I MUST JUST SAY HERE IN THE FORUM MY POEM ABOUT THE FISH LADIES OF THE FRENCH
    REVOLUTION THAT I USED AS AN ATTEMPT AT HUMOUR USING SOME WOMEN POETS I DID
    NOT INTEND TO BE HURTFULL IN ANY WAY I WRITE ON IMPULSE AND SOMETIMES THAT
    CAN LEAD TO PEOPLE BEING HURT NOW I AM NOT IN TRUTH AND REALITY THAT SORT OF MAN SO I SAY TO YOU LOVELY LADIES I DO LOVE YOU AS FELLOW POETS AND WOMAN OF GREAT BEAUTY AND DO STAND BEFORE YOU ALL LIKE A HUMBLE MAN AND IF YOU WANT TO EXACT REVENGE THEN I DO BEG YOUR MERCY

    Replies for this message:
  • Rookie - 780 Points Jerry Hughes (12/1/2005 5:29:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    Movers, (those who don't) , and Shakers: Here's a non-esoteric, beautifully written, Bruce Dawe poem. Enjoy it's simplicity.

    ARCH

    After many visits,
    the less-than-long life
    (war service, no kids,
    loss of wife,
    whose mention would have you
    brimming with tears
    if talk inadvertently
    turned to years)
    -there was that last time
    I saw you, the one
    when you looked me straight
    a said simply: 'I'm done.'
    And your voice seemed to come
    from far back in a hall,
    and not from a bed
    in St Andrew's Hospital
    -from a hall with no ending,
    no buzzer, no nurse,
    but no more chart-readings
    of better or worse.

    Replies for this message:
  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (12/1/2005 12:29:00 PM) Post reply | Read 3 replies

    I think it may be good to reformulate the question. What makes American poetry distinctively American, and British poetry distinctively British? (If anything...) . And may I say, I don't have the answer. I could define the standard view of the British character, but I'm not sure that relates directly to the poetry as currently written. Adam, Mark, anyone, could you offer a 'typically British' decent contemporary poem as evidence? (We could always look at Andrew Motion's best, for lack of other choice.) I thought Adam's suggestion of suppressed feeling an interesting view.

    Replies for this message:
    • Rookie Joseph Daly (12/2/2005 8:20:00 AM) Post reply

      I think that American arts have a universal appeal, and that the answer can be found by looking at the history of both nations. Britain tends towards parochialism and hence it’s poetry and other arts ... more

    • Rookie Declan McHenry (12/1/2005 3:00:00 PM) Post reply

      I just re-read Benjamin Zephaniah's poem 'The British' which perhaps highlights the possible difficulty in finding a 'typically British' poem (especially as I'd class Zephaniah as a very contemporary ... more


    To read all of 3 replies click here
  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (12/1/2005 5:49:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    Thanks for the contributions on possible differences between British and American approaches to poetry. It's a subtle subject, difficult to pin down - if indeed there is anything to pin down - and goes deeper than colloquialism, though that is one sign of 'loosening up'on both sides. And obviously there are and have been cross-Atlantic influences. (Crudely, breezy v. referenced...!) If anyone knows of any writing on this subject, I'd be grateful to hear of it. As I said, I may be chasing a hairy goose up the wrong tree-bark...or not. I think it's worth pursuing, though. At least for me.

    First review of my poetry book comes next week, in a small-circulation mag, a whole year after publication... cuts one down to size! Pray for me, fingers crossed, whatever... I've been warned, 'does nothing for sales, just makes people feel they don't have to buy the book now they've read the best quotes'... Ha.

    Replies for this message:
    • Rookie Lori Boulard (12/1/2005 10:44:00 AM) Post reply

      good luck with the review. And while I keep telling myself that it's the creation that matters, not the reaction, we all fall victim to hope in the end!

  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (11/30/2005 1:11:00 PM) Post reply | Read 4 replies

    We've had a couple of half-hearted attempts at identifying differences between American and British poetic approaches. This morning I was knocking off one of my pieces of journalistic poetry or poetic journalism, and using one or two colloquial cliches of diction, when I wondered, does this happen in American poetry without being turned into reported speech, '..then Chuck said...'. It occurred to me that I was following Eliot - 'Hurry up please it's time'... and Pinter in his plays. I remember the shock of hearing the dialogue in 'The Caretaker' when it was first put on, and the way that banal remarks could be loaded with menace or omen.
    It happens a lot in American plays of course, being dialogue, and short stories like Damon Runyan. Is the 'heard voice' much used in American poetry?

    This may not be a fruitful topic. But my friends are much intrigued by the possibility of such distinguishing features, really for what it tells us about the possible limitations or explorations of English poetry as of now. Does this ring any bells?

    Replies for this message:
    • Rookie Declan McHenry (12/1/2005 6:33:00 AM) Post reply

      I know my first foray in this was fuelled by a gut feeling rather than any knowledge of the subject. America is a big place. On a whim I undertook a light hearted test recently which was designed to p ... more

    • Rookie Joseph Daly (12/1/2005 4:14:00 AM) Post reply

      Michael, I think that the universiality of 'Americanisms' means that there is a greater understanding of the literal meaning of American colloquialisms. I find, for example, that the use of 'Have a ... more

    • Rookie Max Reif (11/30/2005 4:41:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

      I don't much understand what you're talking about, Michael, the only bell it rang for me is, the 'hurry up please it's time' voice in Eliot is kind of like a Greek chorus, isn't it?


    To read all of 4 replies click here
[Hata Bildir]