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  • Dan Yaron (7/3/2007 4:07:00 PM) Post reply

    Hello! I am looking for a poem that was translated by John Dryden. The poem is apparently by Salvaggi, an italian poet who wrote in Intalian or in Latin. In this poem he praises John Milton and says that Milton is better than both of them together. I found a Hebrew translation of the poem from the English translation by Dryden. The title in hebrew is 'God's three men', but the title can be a paraphrase of the original title of the first translation because I know that the translator belongs to the time in Hebrew literature that translators had much 'artistic freedom', and their translatons weren't completely accurate compared to the original work. If someone knows Hebrew, I can post the Hebrew version, if that will help to find Dryden's translation.

    Thanks in advance!

  • Dion Barker (7/2/2007 1:06:00 PM) Post reply

    im looking for the rest of this poem i read once when i was very young but over the years i can only remember bits of it thats what having kids do to you
    it was on the front cover of a book by daniela steel i cant remember the books name. it starts
    pass hand to hand the wishes the dreams, the hopes of an entire nation sent to war, a score of old men leading all our boys to die. while we watch in horror, in pain................i think this was poem was bril it made me cry the first time i read it when i was about 7 years old

  • Norman Donoghue (6/25/2007 3:34:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    When my grandmother was 95 and again on her hundreth birthday (she passed away at 101 in 1993) , she was able to recite this poem. Can you tell me the source of the various references?

    “Untitled” by Anonymous

    There was a little boy, and
    His name was Robert Reese,
    And every Friday afternoon he had
    To speak a piece.

    So many poems thus he learned,
    That soon he had a score,
    Of recitations in his head,
    and still kept learning more

    Now this is what happened.
    He was called upon one week
    And totally forgot the piece
    he was about to speak.

    His brain he cudgled, not a word remained
    within his head, and so
    He spoke at random,
    and this is what he said:

    “My beaufitul, my beautiful, ”
    why standed proudly by.
    “It was the Schooner Hesperus
    The breaking waves dashed high.”

    “Why is the forum crowded? ”
    “What means this stir in Rome? ”
    “Under the spreading chestnut tree”
    “There is no place like home.”

    When freedom from his mountain height”
    cried “Twinkle, twinkle little star”
    “Shoot if you must this old gray head, ”
    “King Henry of Navarre.”

    “Roll on, thou dark and deep blue
    castled crags of Drachenfels.”
    Many name is Norman. “On the Grampian Hills,
    Ring out wild bells.”

    “If you’re waking, call me early.”
    “To be or not to be, ”
    “The bell must not ring tonight.”
    “Oh, Woodsman, spare that tree.”

    “Charge, Chester, charge on lovely war, ”
    And let who would be clever,
    “The boy stood on the burning deck, ”
    But I go on forever.

    His elocution was superb,
    his voice and gestures fine;
    His schoolmates all applauded
    As he finished the last line.

    “I see, it doesn’t matter, ” said he,
    Just what I say,
    As long as I declaim
    With oratorical display.”

    Please feel free to correct where I have got parts of it wrong. I want to have it right.
    Many thanks.
    Ned Donoghue
    Philadelphia, PA

    Replies for this message:
    • Laura Burns (9/22/2007 12:45:00 PM) Post reply

      The poem is 'The Overworked Elocutionist' by Carolyn Wells. 'It was the schooner Hesperus' is from the 1890 poem 'The Wreck of the Hesperus' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 'The breaking waves dashed ... more

  • Mike Perkins (6/20/2007 1:45:00 AM) Post reply | Read 2 replies

    Hey folks,
    I thought it would be easy to find the words of the traditional 'Twentyone today, twentyone today...' song, but It's not! At 75 it's a long time since it was sung for me! Can anyone help
    Mike. Northland NZ.

    Replies for this message:
    • Ernestine Northover (6/20/2007 9:08:00 AM) Post reply

      Mike, Have found another possible. Twenty-one today, Twenty-one today, I've got the key of the door, Never been twenty-one before, Father said I can do what I like, So shout hip, hip, hooray, For ... more

    • Ernestine Northover (6/20/2007 8:12:00 AM) Post reply

      As far as I can remember it, it goes something like this. Twenty-one today. Twenty-one today. He's/She's got the key of the door, Never been twenty-one before. La la, la la, la, la, la, So we all wan ... more

  • Sampath Smith (6/19/2007 4:19:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    dear ppl out there Im looking for this poem can any one help me

    I have just listened it once but i dont know who is the poet so cant figure out...this is a part of it
    'Give me a guy
    with a straight forward eye
    a smile that he uses
    but never abuses
    and a grip that hurts your hand'

    please help to find this

    Replies for this message:
    • Sampath Smith (6/19/2007 4:26:00 PM) Post reply

      havent any one got idea? ? ? ? Give me a guy with a straight forward eye a smile that he uses but never abuses and a grip that hurts your hand

  • Deb Furlong (6/10/2007 12:45:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    I heard a poem by David Wagner today on a classical music station. The name of the poem is 'A Girl Playing in the Sand' by David Wagner. There is a poet by that name listed as a member of this site and I have sent him an E-Mail asking if he is the correct David Wagner. I am looking for a copy of this poem.

    Can anyone help?

    Thanks!
    Deb

    Replies for this message:
    • Cia Frizzell (6/25/2007 6:21:00 PM) Post reply

      A Girl Playing In A Sandbox A Girl Playing in a Sandbox She drops the plastic soldiers, the trucks And tanks and caissons over the side Of the sandbox and ... more

  • James Murphy (6/9/2007 9:01:00 AM) Post reply

    i am looking for a poem by sir edwin arnold about the victoria cross.
    i thought it was 'the frist distribution of the victoria cross' which was published in 'the secret of death'. however, this is not the poem i want.

    the poem i want has the following verse:

    Thus saith the Queen: 'For him who gave
    His life as nothing in the fight,
    So he from Russian wrong might save
    My crown, my people, and my right;
    Let there be made a cross of bronze,
    And grave thereon my queenly crest;
    Write 'Valour' on its haughty scroll,
    And hang it on his breast.'

    anyone any ideas?
    regards james murphy(seamasomurchu@hotmail.com)

  • Jennifer Smith (6/5/2007 5:07:00 PM) Post reply

    hello, i once read a poem my aunt gave me and cannot track it down does any one recognise part of it that i think went like this: Sleep on fair maiden and dream of heaven a while. Your rosey lips still where a smile and breath and sigh delicious sighs, now she murmers, now she speeks what most i wish but fear to know. and now how like a saint she sleeps, hands mantled over breasts of snow...........

  • Susanne Burton (5/25/2007 10:34:00 AM) Post reply | Read 2 replies

    Help please, I am looking for the poem that talks about the difference between chaining the heart and loving somebody, and planting your own garden and with every goodbye we grow. It is pretty well known but I can't remember the name. Thank you :)

    Replies for this message:
    • Cia Frizzell (6/25/2007 6:31:00 PM) Post reply

      After a While - by Veronica Shoffstall from 'Mirrors and other Insults', poetry by Veronica A. Shoffstall After a while you learn the subtle difference between holding a hand and chaining ... more

    • Shay Harmon (6/18/2007 8:45:00 AM) Post reply

      I first read this poem in 1986...a friend of mine had a copy of it. It was attributed to a 19-year-old named Veronica Shoftstall and the title was 'Comes the Dawn'. I've seen a 1971 copyrighted versio ... more

  • Tania Banania (5/25/2007 4:02:00 AM) Post reply

    Hi Im looking for a poem called 'Road 1904'. It's about a woman picking up an abandoned baby in the middle of road of a war-torn country. There is aline in the poem that goes 'Heavy as lead Heavy as the Dead' if that helps. I would REALLY appreciate it if someone could find it online for me. I have searched google and yahoo and on this site and cannot find it anywhere...

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