William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

William Wordsworth Quotes

  • ''The Child is father of the Man;
    And I could wish my days to be
    Bound each to each by natural piety.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. My Heart Leaps Up When I Behold (l. 7-9). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    2920 person liked.
    905 person did not like.
  • ''Imagination, which in truth
    Is but another name for absolute power
    And clearest insight, amplitude of mind,
    And reason, in her most exalted mood.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude; XIV. Conclusion (l. 189-192). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''The child is father of the man.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. My Heart Leaps Up When I Behold (written 1802, published 1807).
  • ''Instruct them how the mind of Man becomes
    A thousand times more beautiful than the earth
    On which he dwells,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude; XIV. Conclusion (l. 448-450). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''My heart leaps up when I behold
    A rainbow in the sky:''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. My Heart Leaps Up When I Behold (l. 1-2). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''And a single small cottage, a nest like a dove's,
    The one only dwelling on earth that she loves.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Reverie of Poor Susan (l. 11-12). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''Nuns fret not at their convent's narrow room;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Nuns Fret Not at Their Convent's Narrow Room (l. 1). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''Through love, through hope, and faith's transcendent dower,
    We feel that we are greater than we know.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The River Duddon. . . The Poems; Vol. 2 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1989) Penguin Books.
  • ''In truth the prison, unto which we doom
    Ourselves, no prison is:''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Nuns Fret Not at Their Convent's Narrow Room (l. 8-9). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''Still glides the Stream, and shall for ever glide;
    The Forms remains, the Function never dies;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The River Duddon. . . The Poems; Vol. 2 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1989) Penguin Books.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Wordsworth

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I ...

Read the full of I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

The Trosachs

THERE 's not a nook within this solemn Pass,
   But were an apt confessional for one
   Taught by his summer spent, his autumn gone,
That Life is but a tale of morning grass
Wither'd at eve. From scenes of art which chase
   That thought away, turn, and with watchful eyes
   Feed it 'mid Nature's old felicities,
Rocks, rivers, and smooth lakes more clear than glass
Untouch'd, unbreathed upon. Thrice happy quest,

[Report Error]