William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Comments about William Shakespeare

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  • Asharaf East (6/20/2014 9:25:00 PM)

    Ya

    19 person liked.
    9 person did not like.
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  • Douglas Scotney (4/24/2014 2:26:00 AM)

    He felt very guilty when his son, Hamnet, died at Stratford at 11 years of age in 1596, while he was in London. Did he blame his wife and make her the Queen in Hamlet?

  • Parul Naveen (3/1/2014 12:50:00 AM)

    very nice poem.
    our life is just like that stage which is talk about in this poem.
    William Shakespeare is a great poet.

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  • Wahab Abdul (12/12/2013 2:02:00 AM)

    Shakespeare employed the pathetic fallacy, or the attribution of human characteristics or emotions to elements in nature or inanimate objects, throughout his plays. In the sonnets, the speaker frequently employs the pathetic fallacy, associating his absence from the young man to the freezing days of December and the promise of their reunion to a pregnant spring. Weather and the seasons also stand in for human emotions: the speaker conveys his sense of foreboding about death by likening himself to autumn, a time in which nature’s objects begin to decay and ready themselves for winter, or death. Similarly, despite the arrival of “proud-pied April” (2) in Sonnet 98, the speaker still feels as if it were winter because he and the young man are apart. The speaker in Sonnet 18, one of Shakespeare’s most famous poems, begins by rhetorically asking the young man, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? ” (1) . He spends the remainder of the poem explaining the multiple ways in which the young man is superior to a summer day, ultimately concluding that while summer ends, the young man’s beauty lives on in the permanence of poetry.

  • Sanjay Singh Saharan (11/2/2013 6:42:00 AM)

    this poem is very nice

  • Laurel Vijitha ... (10/10/2013 10:26:00 AM)

    whn he writes a poem n whn v read it cums to reality! ! he's just awsm! ! n I even lyk Robert Frost

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Sonnet LXVI

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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