William Makepeace Thackeray

(1811-1863 / India)

William Makepeace Thackeray Quotes

  • ''Kindnesses are easily forgotten; but injuries!—what worthy man does not keep those in mind?''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. Lovel the Widower, ch. 1 (1860).
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  • ''Despair is perfectly compatible with a good dinner, I promise you.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. Lovel the Widower, ch. 6 (1860).
  • ''It is best to love wisely, no doubt: but to love foolishly is better than not to be able to love at all.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. Pendennis, ch. 6 (1848-1850).
  • ''It is impossible, in our condition of Society, not to be sometimes a Snob.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Book of Snobs, ch. 3 (1848).
  • ''It is to the middle-class we must look for the safety of England.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Four Georges, "George the Third," (1855).
  • '''Tis strange what a man may do, and a woman yet think him an angel.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The History of Henry Esmond, bk. 1, ch. 7 (1852).
  • '''Tis strange what a man may do, and a woman yet think him an angel.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The History of Henry Esmond, bk. 1, ch. 7 (1852).
  • ''What money is better bestowed than that of a schoolboy's tip? How the kindness is recalled by the recipient in after days! It blesses him that gives and him that takes.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Newcomes, bk. 1, ch. 16 (1853-1855).
  • ''There is no good ... in living in a society where you are merely the equal of everybody else.... The true pleasure of life is to live with your inferiors.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Newcomes, bk. 1, ch. 9 (1855).
  • ''I would rather make my name than inherit it.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Virginians, ch. 26 (1857-1859).

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Best Poem of William Makepeace Thackeray

King Canute

KING CANUTE was weary hearted; he had reigned for years a score,
Battling, struggling, pushing, fighting, killing much and robbing more;
And he thought upon his actions, walking by the wild sea-shore.

'Twixt the Chancellor and Bishop walked the King with steps sedate,
Chamberlains and grooms came after, silversticks and goldsticks great,
Chaplains, aides-de-camp, and pages,—all the officers of state.

Sliding after like his shadow, pausing when he chose to pause,
If a frown his face contracted, straight the courtiers dropped their jaws;
If to laugh the king was ...

Read the full of King Canute

The Cane-Bottom'D Chair

In tattered old slippers that toast at the bars,
And a ragged old jacket perfumed with cigars,
Away from the world, and its toils and its cares,
I've a snug little kingdom up four pair of stairs.

To mount to this realm is a toil, to be sure,
But the fire there is bright and the air rather pure;
And the view I behold on a sunshiny day
Is grand through the chimney-pots over the way.

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