William Makepeace Thackeray

(1811-1863 / India)

William Makepeace Thackeray Quotes

  • ''Kindnesses are easily forgotten; but injuries!—what worthy man does not keep those in mind?''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. Lovel the Widower, ch. 1 (1860).
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  • ''Despair is perfectly compatible with a good dinner, I promise you.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. Lovel the Widower, ch. 6 (1860).
  • ''It is best to love wisely, no doubt: but to love foolishly is better than not to be able to love at all.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. Pendennis, ch. 6 (1848-1850).
  • ''It is impossible, in our condition of Society, not to be sometimes a Snob.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Book of Snobs, ch. 3 (1848).
  • ''It is to the middle-class we must look for the safety of England.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Four Georges, "George the Third," (1855).
  • '''Tis strange what a man may do, and a woman yet think him an angel.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The History of Henry Esmond, bk. 1, ch. 7 (1852).
  • '''Tis strange what a man may do, and a woman yet think him an angel.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The History of Henry Esmond, bk. 1, ch. 7 (1852).
  • ''What money is better bestowed than that of a schoolboy's tip? How the kindness is recalled by the recipient in after days! It blesses him that gives and him that takes.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Newcomes, bk. 1, ch. 16 (1853-1855).
  • ''There is no good ... in living in a society where you are merely the equal of everybody else.... The true pleasure of life is to live with your inferiors.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Newcomes, bk. 1, ch. 9 (1855).
  • ''I would rather make my name than inherit it.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Virginians, ch. 26 (1857-1859).

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Best Poem of William Makepeace Thackeray

To His Serving Boy

Persicos odi
Puer, apparatus;
Displicent nexae
Philyra coronae:
Mitte sectari,
Rosa qua locorum
Sera moretur.

Simplici myrto
Nihil allabores
Sedulus, curo:
Neque te ministrum
Dedecet myrtus,
Neque me sub arcta
Vite bibentem.

Read the full of To His Serving Boy

The Age Of Wisdom

Ho! pretty page, with the dimpled chin,
That never has known the Barber's shear,
All your wish is woman to win;
This is the way that boys begin--
Wait till you come to Forty Year.

Curly gold locks cover foolish brains,
Billing and cooing is all your cheer;
Sighing and singing of midnight strains,

[Hata Bildir]