William Makepeace Thackeray

(1811-1863 / India)

William Makepeace Thackeray Quotes

  • ''Kindnesses are easily forgotten; but injuries!—what worthy man does not keep those in mind?''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. Lovel the Widower, ch. 1 (1860).
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  • ''Despair is perfectly compatible with a good dinner, I promise you.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. Lovel the Widower, ch. 6 (1860).
  • ''It is best to love wisely, no doubt: but to love foolishly is better than not to be able to love at all.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. Pendennis, ch. 6 (1848-1850).
  • ''It is impossible, in our condition of Society, not to be sometimes a Snob.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Book of Snobs, ch. 3 (1848).
  • ''It is to the middle-class we must look for the safety of England.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Four Georges, "George the Third," (1855).
  • '''Tis strange what a man may do, and a woman yet think him an angel.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The History of Henry Esmond, bk. 1, ch. 7 (1852).
  • '''Tis strange what a man may do, and a woman yet think him an angel.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The History of Henry Esmond, bk. 1, ch. 7 (1852).
  • ''What money is better bestowed than that of a schoolboy's tip? How the kindness is recalled by the recipient in after days! It blesses him that gives and him that takes.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Newcomes, bk. 1, ch. 16 (1853-1855).
  • ''There is no good ... in living in a society where you are merely the equal of everybody else.... The true pleasure of life is to live with your inferiors.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Newcomes, bk. 1, ch. 9 (1855).
  • ''I would rather make my name than inherit it.''
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), British author. The Virginians, ch. 26 (1857-1859).

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Best Poem of William Makepeace Thackeray

A Tragic Story

There lived a sage in days of yore,
And he a handsome pigtail wore;
But wondered much and sorrowed more,
Because it hung behind him.

He mused upon this curious case,
And swore he'd change the pigtail's place,
And have it hanging at his face,
Not dangling there behind him.

Says he, 'The mystery I've found -
Says he, 'The mystery I've found!
I'll turn me round,' - he turned him round;
But still it hung behind him.

Then round and round, and out and in,
All day the puzzled sage did spin;
In vain - it mattered not a pin -
The ...

Read the full of A Tragic Story

At The Church-Gate

Although I enter not,
Yet round about the spot,
Ofttimes I hover,
And near the sacred gate,
With longing eyes I wait,
Expectant of her.

The minster-bell tolls out
Above the city's rout,

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