Treasure Island

Walter Savage Landor

(30 January 1775 – 17 September 1864 / Warwick)

Quotations

  • ''Death stands above me, whispering low
    I know not what into my ear;''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Death Stands above Me (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
    5 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • ''O what a thing is age! Death without death's quiet.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British author, poet. "Epicurus, Leontion, and Ternissa," Imaginary Conversations (1824-1829).
  • ''I warmed both hands before the fire of life;
    It sinks, and I am ready to depart.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British author. Finis.
  • ''I have since written what no tide
    Shall ever wash away, what men
    Unborn shall read o'er ocean wide
    And find Ianthe's name agen.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Ianthe (l. 3-4). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
  • ''From you, Ianthe, little troubles pass
    Like little ripples down a sunny river;''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Ianthe (l. 1-6). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Verse calls them forth; 'tis verse that gives
    Immortal youth to mortal maids.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Ianthe (l. 3-4). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Prose on certain occasions can bear a great deal of poetry; on the other hand, poetry sinks and swoons under a moderate weight of prose.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British author. Imaginary Conversations, "Archdeacon Hare and Walter Landor," The Last Fruit of an Old Tree (1853).
  • ''And about her courts were seen
    Liveried angels robed in green,
    Wearing, by St Patrick's bounty,
    Emeralds big as half the county.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Ireland Never Was Contented (l. 7-10). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
  • ''My slumber broken and my doublet torn,
    I find the laurel also bears a thorn.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Lately Our Poets (l. 9-10). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Lately our poets loiter'd in green lanes,
    Content to catch the ballads of the plains;''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Lately Our Poets (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).

Read more quotations »

Child of a Day

Child of a day, thou knowest not
The tears that overflow thy urn,
The gushing eyes that read thy lot,
Nor, if thou knewest, couldst return!

And why the wish! the pure and blest
Watch like thy mother o'er thy sleep.
O peaceful night! O envied rest!
Thou wilt not ever see her weep.

[Hata Bildir]