Treasure Island

Walter Savage Landor

(30 January 1775 – 17 September 1864 / Warwick)

Quotations

  • ''Death stands above me, whispering low
    I know not what into my ear;''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Death Stands above Me (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
    5 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • ''O what a thing is age! Death without death's quiet.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British author, poet. "Epicurus, Leontion, and Ternissa," Imaginary Conversations (1824-1829).
  • ''I warmed both hands before the fire of life;
    It sinks, and I am ready to depart.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British author. Finis.
  • ''I have since written what no tide
    Shall ever wash away, what men
    Unborn shall read o'er ocean wide
    And find Ianthe's name agen.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Ianthe (l. 3-4). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
  • ''From you, Ianthe, little troubles pass
    Like little ripples down a sunny river;''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Ianthe (l. 1-6). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Verse calls them forth; 'tis verse that gives
    Immortal youth to mortal maids.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Ianthe (l. 3-4). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Prose on certain occasions can bear a great deal of poetry; on the other hand, poetry sinks and swoons under a moderate weight of prose.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British author. Imaginary Conversations, "Archdeacon Hare and Walter Landor," The Last Fruit of an Old Tree (1853).
  • ''And about her courts were seen
    Liveried angels robed in green,
    Wearing, by St Patrick's bounty,
    Emeralds big as half the county.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Ireland Never Was Contented (l. 7-10). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
  • ''My slumber broken and my doublet torn,
    I find the laurel also bears a thorn.''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Lately Our Poets (l. 9-10). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Lately our poets loiter'd in green lanes,
    Content to catch the ballads of the plains;''
    Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Lately Our Poets (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).

Read more quotations »

On Catullus

Tell me not what too well I know
About the bard of Sirmio.
Yes, in Thalia’s son
Such stains there are—as when a Grace
Sprinkles another’s laughing face
With nectar, and runs on.

[Hata Bildir]