Walt Whitman

(31 May 1819 - 26 March 1892 / New York / United States)

Comments about Walt Whitman

  • Rookie Amanda Patrick (12/8/2005 11:01:00 AM)

    In the poem, 'Tears, ' Whitman is very depressed. He talks about crying on the shore of the beach and just letting himself go. He doesn't know who he is anymore. He talks about how he is calm during the day and doesn't show his inner feelings, and how at night he becomes very depressed again without any one knowing.

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  • Rookie Amanda Patrick (12/8/2005 10:44:00 AM)

    When I read the poem, 'Sparkles From The Wheel', I thought whitman was saying how something so little can turn out to be so beautiful. For example, in the line when he says, 'The scene, and all its belongings-how they seize and affect me! '

  • Rookie Alicia Hodkin (12/8/2005 10:39:00 AM)

    In the poem, 'Sparkels From The Wheel, ' Walt Whitman is stepping away from the crowded, busy part of life and looking beyond what the world would see. To him, he sees a man who's working hard and giving all he has into his job. For example, he 'carefully holds it' and has percision. What the world would see as a man of poverty, Whitman sees as a skill that brings awe.

  • Rookie Amanda Patrick (12/8/2005 10:26:00 AM)

    In the poem 'Solid, Ironical, Rolling Orb' the last line says 'And of me, as lover and hero.' I thought this line meant that whitman was now a lover of the earth, and that he was a hero to himself because he passed earth's tests.

  • Rookie Kristina Carter (12/2/2005 11:17:00 AM)

    In the poem, 'Laws of Creation, ' Whitman talks about questions people have asked while trying to make their own creation. He is trying to show that there are no rules to creation, and there are no boundaries as long as it was created.

  • Rookie Alicia Hodkin (12/2/2005 11:13:00 AM)

    In the poem 'Solid, Ironical, Rolling Orb' Whitman is talking about how the earth in it's huge solid form, is challenging his 'ideal dreams.' He finally decides that he has to accept what is given to him.
    What do you think about the statement 'And of me, as lover and hero? ' (amanda and shelly r.)

  • Rookie Kristina Carter (12/2/2005 11:10:00 AM)

    I like the poem, 'Lessons.' It talks about how people usually only teach others about the good things, but it is just as important to teach someone about bad things. It may hurt the person you are teaching the bad things to, but if you love them, like Whitman says, then you'll do it for their good.

  • Rookie Kristina Carter (12/2/2005 11:03:00 AM)

    In the poem, 'Miracles, ' I really like the point that Whitman is trying to make. Everything in life really is a miracle. Just watching the grass blow in the wind is a miracle. Whitman is showing that everything in life is important, even the small things that no one really thinks about.

  • Rookie Stephen Cummins (12/2/2005 10:55:00 AM)

    in the poem 'calvary crossing a ford' it tells of an American troop of soldiers, but to me this poem seems to bring a sense of pride about, because you see the soldiers after a battle, crossing the ford to make their way into the next combat situation and risking their lives to protect those back home, also you hear of the flag waving in the wind as it still stands tall after the battle

  • Rookie Tony Triplett (12/2/2005 10:48:00 AM)

    This poem 'A Sight in Camp', one of those stories that keep you guessing who it is that the author sees dead and divine. I really enjoy this peom, because it makes you wonder if that was an experince that he had to go through while helping the soldiers, if he saw a dead soldier lying on a strecther having no clue at all who it is, while walking up starts to realize that it was one of his friends.

Best Poem of Walt Whitman

O Captain! My Captain!

O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up--for you the flag is flung--for you the bugle trills; 10
For you bouquets and ...

Read the full of O Captain! My Captain!

The Great City

The place where a great city stands is not the place of stretch'd wharves, docks, manufactures, deposits of produce merely,
Nor the place of ceaseless salutes of new-comers or the anchor-lifters of the departing,
Nor the place of the tallest and costliest buildings or shops selling goods from the rest of the earth,
Nor the place of the best libraries and schools, nor the place where money is plentiest,
Nor the place of the most numerous population.

Where the city stands with the brawniest

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