Treasure Island

Thomas Gray

(1716-1771 / London / England)

Quotations

  • ''Far from the sun and summer-gale
    In thy green lap was Nature's Darling laid,
    What time, where lucid Avon stray'd,
    To him the mighty mother did unveil
    Her awful face:''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 82-86). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
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  • ''Her track, where'er the Goddess roves,
    Glory pursue, and generous Shame,
    Th' unconquerable Mind, and Freedom's holy flame.''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 62-64). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
  • ''Now the rich stream of Music winds along
    Deep, majestic, smooth, and strong,''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 7-8). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
  • ''Yet shall he mount, and keep his distant way
    Beyond the limits of a vulgar fate:
    Beneath the Good how far—but far above the Great.''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 120-122). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
  • ''O'er her warm cheek and rising bosom move
    The bloom of young desire and purple light of love.''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. J. Rogers (1953). The Progress of Poesy, pt. 1, sct. 3, l. 16-7 (written 1754, published 1757).
  • ''He saw: but blasted with excess of light,
    Closed his eyes in endless night.''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 100-101). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
  • ''Nor second He, that rode sublime
    Upon the seraph-wings of Ecstasy
    The secrets of the Abyss to spy:''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 94-96). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
  • ''From Helicon's harmonious springs
    A thousand rills their mazy progress take:''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 3-4). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
  • ''Each in his narrow cell for ever laid,
    The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. "Elegy in a Country Churchyard," st. 4.
  • ''Let not ambition mock their useful toil,
    Their homely joys, and destiny obscure;
    Nor grandeur hear with a disdainful smile,
    The short and simple annals of the poor.''
    Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. J. Rogers (1953). Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, st. 8 (1751).

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The Bard

'Ruin seize thee, ruthless King!
Confusion on thy banners wait,
Tho' fanned by Conquest's crimson wing
They mock the air with idle state.
Helm, nor Hauberk's twisted mail,
Nor even thy virtues, Tyrant, shall avail
To save thy secret soul from nightly fears,
From Cambria'sÊ curse, from Cambria's tears!'
Such were the sounds, that o'er the crested pride

[Hata Bildir]