Theocritus

(315 BC - 260 BC / Greece)

Theocritus Poems

1. The Distaff 9/24/2012
2. The Drawn Battle 9/24/2012
3. Epitaph Of Cleita, Nurse Of Medeius 9/24/2012
4. Epitaph Of Cleonicus 9/24/2012
5. Epitaph Of Eurymedon 9/24/2012
6. Epitaph Of Eurymedon 9/24/2012
7. The Bacchanals 9/24/2012
8. For A Statue Of Æscalupius 9/24/2012
9. For A Statue Of Anacreon 9/24/2012
10. For A Statue Of The Muses 9/24/2012
11. Ortho's Epitaph 9/24/2012
12. Pastorals 9/24/2012
13. Poor Thyrsus! 9/24/2012
14. A Statue Of Figwood 9/24/2012
15. The Sweethearts 9/24/2012
16. To Archilochus 9/24/2012
17. To Epicharmus 9/24/2012
18. The Two Ladies Of Syracuse 9/24/2012
19. The Two Workmen 9/24/2012
20. Under A Statue Of Peisander 9/24/2012
21. For A Tripod Erected By Damoteles To Bacchus 9/24/2012
22. The Giant's Wooing 9/24/2012
23. The Death Of Daphnis 9/24/2012
24. For A Statue Of The Heavenly Aphrodite 9/24/2012
25. The Battle Of The Bards 9/24/2012
26. The Love Of Thyonichus 9/24/2012
27. Hylas 9/24/2012
28. The Herdsmen 9/24/2012
29. Sing Something Sweet 9/24/2012
30. The Serenade 9/24/2012
31. The Death Of Adonis 9/24/2012
32. A Countryman's Wooing 9/24/2012
33. Harvest-Home 9/24/2012
34. Loves 9/24/2012
35. Epitaph Of Eusthenes 9/24/2012
36. Epitaph Of Hipponax 9/24/2012
37. Love Stealing Honey 9/24/2012
38. The Sorceress 9/24/2012
39. Heracles The Lion Slayer 9/24/2012
40. Idyll Xii 1/1/2004
Best Poem of Theocritus

The Psalm Of Adonis - From Fifteenth Idyll

O Queen that loves Golgi, and Idalium,
And the steep of Eryx,
O Aphrodite, that playes with gold,
Lo, from the stream eternal of Acheron
They have brought back to you Adonis---
Even in the twelfth month they have brought him,
The dainty-footed Hours.
Tardiest of the Immortals are the beloved Hours,
But dear and desired they come,
For always, to all mortals,
They bring some gift with them.
O Cypris, daughter of Dione,
From mortal to immortal, so men tell,
You have changed Berenice, dropping softly in
The woman's breast the stuff of ...

Read the full of The Psalm Of Adonis - From Fifteenth Idyll

Idyll Xii

Art come, dear youth? two days and nights away!
(Who burn with love, grow aged in a day.)
As much as apples sweet the damson crude
Excel; the blooming spring the winter rude;
In fleece the sheep her lamb; the maiden in sweetness
The thrice-wed dame; the fawn the calf in fleetness;
The nightingale in song all feathered kind-
So much thy longed-for presence cheers my mind.
To thee I hasten, as to shady beech,

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