Sir Philip Sidney

(1554 - 1586 / Kent / England)

Quotations

  • ''Nor envy's snaky eye, finds harbour here,
    Nor flatterers' venomous insinuations,
    Nor cunning humorists' puddled opinions,
    Nor courteous ruin of proffered usury,
    Nor time prattled away, cradle of ignorance,
    Nor causeless duty, nor comber of arrogance,
    Nor trifling title of vanity dazzleth us,
    Nor golden manacles stand for a paradise;''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet. Arcadia. . . Poets of the English Language, Vols. I-V. Vol. I: Langland to Spenser; Vol. II: Marlowe to Marvell; Vol. III: Milton to Goldsmith; Vol. IV: Blake to Poe; Vol. V: Tennyson to Yeats. W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson, eds. (1950) The Viking Press.
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  • ''Come Sleep! Oh Sleep, the certain knot of peace,
    The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe,
    The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release,
    Th'indifferent judge between the high and low.''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet, diplomat, soldier. Astrophel and Stella, sonnet 39 (1591).
  • ''Thus, with child to speak, and helpless in my throes,
    Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite:
    Fool! said my muse to me, look in thy heart, and write.''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet, diplomat, soldier. Astrophel and Stella, sonnet 1 (1591).
  • ''With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st the skies;
    How silently, and with how wan a face.''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet, diplomat, soldier. Astrophel and Stella, sonnet 31 (1591).
  • ''Yea, worse than death: death parts both woe and joy:
    From joy I part, still living in annoy.''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet. Certain Sonnets: A Farewell (l. 13-14). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Oft have I mused, but now at length I find,
    Why those that die, men say they do depart.''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet. Certain Sonnets: A Farewell (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
  • ''With a tale, forsooth, he cometh unto you; with a tale which holdeth children from play, and old men from the chimney corner.''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet, diplomat, soldier. Defence of Poesie (written 1579-1580, published 1595).
  • ''O take fast hold; let that light be thy guide
    In this small course which birth draws out to death,''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet. Love Me, O Love (l. 5-8). . . Heath Introduction to Poetry, The. Joseph de Roche, ed. (3d ed., 1988) D. C. Heath and Company.
  • ''Thy necessity is yet greater than mine.''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet, diplomat, soldier. Quoted in Life of Sir Philip Sidney, ch. 12, Sir Fulke Greville (1652). offering his water to a dying soldier, at the battle of Zutphen, Sept. 22, 1586, where Sidney himself had received a mortal wound.
  • ''Ring out your bells, let mourning shows be spread.''
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), British poet. Ring Out Your Bells (l. 1). HeIP. Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.

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Sonnet X: Reason

Reason, in faith thou art well serv'd, that still
Wouldst brabbling be with sense and love in me:
I rather wish'd thee climb the Muses' hill,
Or reach the fruit of Nature's choicest tree,

Or seek heav'n's course, or heav'n's inside to see:
Why shouldst thou toil our thorny soil to till?
Leave sense, and those which sense's objects be:
Deal thou with powers of thoughts, leave love to will.

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