Treasure Island

Sir John Suckling

(1606-1642)

Quotations

  • ''Why so pale and wan, fond lover
    Prithee, why so pale?''
    Sir John Suckling (1609-1642), British poet, playwright. Aglaura (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''Quit, quit, for shame; this will not move,
    This cannot take her.
    If of herself she will not love,
    Nothing can make her:
    The devil take her!''
    Sir John Suckling (1609-1642), British poet, playwright. Aglaura (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Will, when speaking well can't win her,
    Saying nothing do't?
    Prithee, why so mute?''
    Sir John Suckling (1609-1642), British poet, playwright. Aglaura (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Of thee (kind boy) I ask no red and white
    to make up my delight,
    no odd becoming graces,
    Black eyes, or little know-not-whats, in faces;
    Make me but mad enough, give me good store
    Of Love, for her I Court
    I ask no more,
    'Tis love in love that makes the sport.

    There's no such thing as that we beauty call,
    it is meer cousenage all;''
    Sir John Suckling (1609-1642), British poet, playwright. Of thee (kind boy) I ask no red and white (l. 1-10). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''If I a fancy take
    To black and blue,
    That fancy doth it beauty make.''
    Sir John Suckling (1609-1642), British poet, playwright. Of thee (kind boy) I ask no red and white (l. 14-16). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''Oh for some honest lover's ghost,
    Some kind unbodied post
    Sent from the shades below!
    I strangely long to know
    Whether the nobler chaplets wear
    Those that their mistress' scorn did bear,
    Or those that were used kindly.''
    Sir John Suckling (1609-1642), British poet, playwright. Oh! For some honest lover's ghost (l. 1-7). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
  • '''Tis now since I sat down before
    That foolish fort, a heart,
    ( Time strangely spent) a year, and more,
    And still I did my part:''
    Sir John Suckling (1609-1642), British poet, playwright. 'Tis Now, Since I Sat Down Before (l. 1-4). . . Poets of the English Language, Vols. I-V. Vol. I: Langland to Spenser; Vol. II: Marlowe to Marvell; Vol. III: Milton to Goldsmith; Vol. IV: Blake to Poe; Vol. V: Tennyson to Yeats. W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson, eds. (1950) The Viking Press.
  • ''For beauties from worth arise
    Are like the grace of deities,''
    Sir John Suckling (1609-1642), British poet, playwright, and Owen Felltham (c.1602-1668), British poet. When, dearest, I but think on thee (attributed to Suckling and to Felltham) (l. 4-5). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Thus while I sit and sigh the day
    With all his borrow'd lights away,
    Till night's black wings do overtake me,
    Thinking on thee, thy beauties then,
    As sudden lights do sleepy men,
    So they by their bright rays awake me.''
    Sir John Suckling (1609-1642), British poet, playwright, and Owen Felltham (c.1602-1668), British poet. When, dearest, I but think on thee (attributed to Suckling and to Felltham) (l. 7-12). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.

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A Doubt of Martyrdom

O for some honest lover’s ghost,
Some kind unbodied post
Sent from the shades below!
I strangely long to know
Whether the noble chaplets wear
Those that their mistress’ scorn did bear
Or those that were used kindly.

For whatsoe’er they tell us here

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