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(1772-1834 / Devon / England)

Quotations

  • ''Weave a circle round him thrice,
    And close your eyes with holy dread,
    For he on honey-dew hath fed,
    And drunk the milk of Paradise.''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Kubla Khan; or, A Vision in a Dream (l. 51-54). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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  • ''But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted
    Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover!
    A savage place! as holy and enchanted
    As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted
    By woman wailing for her demon-lover!''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Kubla Khan; or, A Vision in a Dream (l. 12-16). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • ''Five miles meandering with a mazy motion''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Kubla Khan; or, A Vision in a Dream (l. 25). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • ''All thoughts, all passions, all delights,
    Whatever stirs this mortal frame,
    Are all but ministers of Love,
    And feed his sacred flame.''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Love (l. 1-4). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • ''Iambics march from short to long;—
    With a leap and a bound the swift Anapaests throng;''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Metrical Feet: Lesson for a Boy (l. 5-6). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • ''Wit's forge and fire-blast, meaning's press and screw.''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. On Donne's Poetry (l. 4). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • ''Mr. Mum's Rudesheimer
    And the church of St. Geryon
    Are the two things alone
    That deserve to be known
    In the body-and-soul-stinking town of Cologne.''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. On My Joyful Departure from the City of Cologne (l. 3-7). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • ''Summer has set in with its usual severity.''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Letter, May 9, 1826, by essayist Charles Lamb. Quoted in Letters of Charles Lamb, vol. 2, ed. Alfed Ainger (1888).
  • ''The English public are not yet ripe to comprehend the essential difference between the reason and the understanding,—between a principle and a maxim—an eternal truth and a mere conclusion from a generalization of a great number of facts.... Suppose Adam watching the sun sinking under the horizon for the first time; he is seized with gloom and terror, relieved with scarce a ray of hope of ever seeing the glorious light again. The next evening when it declines, his hopes are stronger but mixed with fear, and even at the end of 1000 years, all that a man can feel, is hope and an expectation so strong as to preclude anxiety. Compare this in its highest degree with the assurance which you have that the two sides of any triangle are greater than the third. This demonstrated of one triangle is seen to be eternally true of all imaginable triangles. This is the truth perceived at once by the reason, wholly independently of experience. It is and must ever be so, multiply and vary the shapes and sizes of triangles as you may.''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, philosopher, critic. Specimens of the Table Talk of the Late Samuel Taylor Coleridge, entry for August 24, 1831 (1835).
  • ''A State, in idea, is the opposite of a Church. A State regards classes, and not individuals; and it estimates classes, not by internal merit, but external accidents, as property, birth, etc. But a church does the reverse of this, and disregards all external accidents, and looks at men as individual persons, allowing no gradations of ranks, but such as greater or less wisdom, learning, and holiness ought to confer. A Church is, therefore, in idea, the only pure democracy.''
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Specimens of the Table Talk of the Late Samuel Taylor Coleridge, entry for Sept. 19, 1830 (1835).

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Reason

... Finally, what is Reason ? You have often asked me ; and this is my
answer :--

Whene'er the mist, that stands 'twixt God and thee,
[Sublimates] to a pure transparency,
That intercepts no light and adds no stain--
There Reason is, and then begins her reign !

But alas !

[Hata Bildir]