Learn More

Robert Louis Stevenson

(1850-1894 / Edinburgh / Scotland)

Quotations

  • ''The obscurest epoch is to-day.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 26 (1924). The Day After Tomorrow (first published 1887).
    141 person liked.
    75 person did not like.
  • ''Well, well, Henry James is pretty good, though he is of the nineteenth century, and that glaringly.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Letter, March 1889, to Henry James. The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson, vol. 2 (1899).
  • ''To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "El Dorado," (1881).
  • ''The cruellest lies are often told in silence. A man may have sat in a room for hours and not opened his mouth, and yet come out of that room a disloyal friend or a vile calumniator.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "Virginibus Puerisque," sct. 4 (1881).
  • ''He sows hurry and reaps indigestion.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "An Apology for Idlers," (1881). Referring to "industrious fellows."
  • ''Man is a creature who lives not upon bread alone, but principally by catchwords; and the little rift between the sexes is astonishingly widened by simply teaching one set of catchwords to the girls and another to the boys.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "Virginibus Puerisque," sct. 2 (1881).
  • ''Man is a creature who lives not upon bread alone, but principally by catchwords.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, title essay, pt. 2 (1881).
  • ''You can forgive people who do not follow you through a philosophical disquisition; but to find your wife laughing when you had tears in your eyes, or staring when you were in a fit of laughter, would go some way towards a dissolution of the marriage.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, title essay, pt. 1 (1881).
  • ''You could read Kant by yourself, if you wanted; but you must share a joke with some one else.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "Virginibus Puerisque," sct. 1 (1881).
  • ''Perpetual devotion to what a man calls his business, is only to be sustained by perpetual neglect of many other things.''
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "An Apology for Idlers," (1881).

Read more quotations »

Love's Vicissitudes

AS Love and Hope together
Walk by me for a while,
Link-armed the ways they travel
For many a pleasant mile -
Link-armed and dumb they travel,
They sing not, but they smile.

Hope leaving, Love commences
To practise on the lute;

[Hata Bildir]