Quotations About / On: TRAVEL

  • 41.
    The intellect is vagabond, and our system of education fosters restlessness. Our minds travel when our bodies are forced to stay at home. We imitate; and what is imitation but the travelling of the mind?
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 42.
    Even the elephant carries but a small trunk on his journeys. The perfection of traveling is to travel without baggage.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Yankee in Canada" (1853), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 33, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, travel
  • 43.
    Travel is the most private of pleasures. There is no greater bore than the travel bore. We do not in the least want to hear what he has seen in Hong-Kong.
    (Vita Sackville-West (1892-1962), British novelist, poet. Passenger to Teheran, ch. 1 (1926).)
    More quotations from: Vita Sackville-West, travel
  • 44.
    A part, a large part, of travelling is an engagement of the ego v. the world.... The world is hydra headed, as old as the rocks and as changing as the sea, enmeshed inextricably in its ways. The ego wants to arrive at places safely and on time.
    (Sybille Bedford (b. 1911), British author. repr. In As It Was (1990). "The Quality of Travel," Esquire (New York, Nov. 1961).)
    More quotations from: Sybille Bedford, world, sea, time
  • 45.
    There is a certain relief in change, even though it be from bad to worse; as I have found in travelling in a stage- coach, that it is often a comfort to shift one's position and be bruised in a new place.
    (Washington Irving (1783-1859), U.S. author. Tales of a Traveler, preface (1824).)
    More quotations from: Washington Irving, change
  • 46.
    Traveling, you realize that differences are lost: each city takes to resembling all cities, places exchange their form, order, distances, a shapeless dust cloud invades the continents.
    (Italo Calvino (1923-1985), Italian author, critic. Marco Polo, in Invisible Cities, p. 137 (1972, trans. 1974).)
    More quotations from: Italo Calvino, city, lost
  • 47.
    A modern democracy is a tyranny whose borders are undefined; one discovers how far one can go only by traveling in a straight line until one is stopped.
    (Norman Mailer (b. 1923), U.S. author. The Presidential Papers, preface (1963).)
    More quotations from: Norman Mailer
  • 48.
    I pity the man who can travel from Dan to Beersheba, and cry, 'Tis all barren—and so it is; and so is all the world to him who will not cultivate the fruits it offers.
    (Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "In the Street. Calais." Ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).)
    More quotations from: Laurence Sterne, travel, world
  • 49.
    Overly persuasive a woman's ordinance spreads far, traveling fast; but fast dying a rumor voiced by a woman perishes.
    (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 485.)
    More quotations from: Aeschylus, dying, woman
  • 50.
    Man is an artifact designed for space travel. He is not designed to remain in his present biologic state any more than a tadpole is designed to remain a tadpole.
    (William Burroughs (b. 1914), U.S. author. "Civilian Defense," The Adding Machine (1985).)
    More quotations from: William Burroughs, travel
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