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Quotations About / On: TRAVEL

  • 41.
    ... ideals, standards, aspirations,—those are chameleon words, and take color from their speakers,—often false tints. A scholarly man of my acquaintance once told me that he traveled a thousand miles into the desert to get away from the word uplift, and it was the first word he heard after he reached his destination.
    (Carolyn Wells (1862-1942), U.S. author. The Rest of My Life, ch. 4 (1937).)
    More quotations from: Carolyn Wells, color
  • 42.
    These studies which stimulate the young, divert the old, are an ornament in prosperity and a refuge and comfort in adversity; they delight us at home, are no impediment in public life, keep us company at night, in our travels, and whenever we retire to the country.
    (Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. Pro Archia Poeta, 14.)
  • 43.
    The things which can make life enjoyable remain the same. They are, now as before, reading, music, fine arts, travel, the enjoyment of nature, sports, fashion, social vanity (knightly orders, honorary offices, gatherings) and the intoxication of the senses.
    (Johan Huizinga (1872-1945), Dutch historian. The Autumn of the Middle Ages, ch. 2 (1921, trans. 1995).)
  • 44.
    Travelling, gentlemen, is medieval, today we have means of communication, not to speak of tomorrow and the day after, means of communication that bring the world into our homes, to travel from one place to another is atavistic.
    (Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Professor O., in Homo FaberA Report, p. 100, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959).)
  • 45.
    Traveling, you realize that differences are lost: each city takes to resembling all cities, places exchange their form, order, distances, a shapeless dust cloud invades the continents.
    (Italo Calvino (1923-1985), Italian author, critic. Marco Polo, in Invisible Cities, p. 137 (1972, trans. 1974).)
    More quotations from: Italo Calvino, city, lost
  • 46.
    A modern democracy is a tyranny whose borders are undefined; one discovers how far one can go only by traveling in a straight line until one is stopped.
    (Norman Mailer (b. 1923), U.S. author. The Presidential Papers, preface (1963).)
    More quotations from: Norman Mailer
  • 47.
    I pity the man who can travel from Dan to Beersheba, and cry, 'Tis all barren—and so it is; and so is all the world to him who will not cultivate the fruits it offers.
    (Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "In the Street. Calais." Ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).)
    More quotations from: Laurence Sterne, travel, world
  • 48.
    Overly persuasive a woman's ordinance spreads far, traveling fast; but fast dying a rumor voiced by a woman perishes.
    (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 485.)
    More quotations from: Aeschylus, dying, woman
  • 49.
    Man is an artifact designed for space travel. He is not designed to remain in his present biologic state any more than a tadpole is designed to remain a tadpole.
    (William Burroughs (b. 1914), U.S. author. "Civilian Defense," The Adding Machine (1985).)
    More quotations from: William Burroughs, travel
  • 50.
    In all my travels I never met with any one Scotchman but what was a man of sense: I believe everybody of that country that has any, leaves it as fast as they can.
    (Francis Lockier (1668-1740), British prelate, man of letters. quoted in Joseph Spence, "1730-1732," pt. 2, Anecdotes (1820).)
    More quotations from: Francis Lockier, believe
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