Quotations About / On: SYMPATHY

  • 41.
    It is by a wise economy of nature that those who suffer without change, and whom no one can help, become uninteresting. Yet so it may happen that those who need sympathy the most often attract it the least.
    (F.H. (Francis Herbert) Bradley (1846-1924), British philosopher. Aphorisms, no. 22 (1930).)
  • 42.
    It is in the comprehension of the physically disabled, or disordered ... that we are behind our age.... sympathy as a fine art is backward in the growth of progress ...
    (Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844-1911), U.S. novelist and short story writer. Chapters from a Life, ch. 11 (1897).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, sympathy
  • 43.
    It is in our faults and failings, not in our virtues, that we touch each other, and find sympathy.... It is in our follies that we are one.
    (Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927), British author. "On Vanity and Vanities," Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow (1889).)
    More quotations from: Jerome K Jerome, sympathy
  • 44.
    Thus to him, to this schoolboy under the bending dome of day, is suggested that he and it proceed from one root; one is leaf and one is flower; relation, sympathy, stirring in every vein. And what is that root? Is not that the soul of his soul?
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Oration, August 31, 1837, delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Cambridge, Massachusetts. "The American Scholar," repr. In Emerson: Essays and Lectures, ed. Joel Porte (1983).)
  • 45.
    I am grown by sympathy a little eager and sentimental, but leave me alone, and I should relish every hour and what it brought me, the pot-luck of the day, as heartily as the oldest gossip in the bar-room.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Experience," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 46.
    The pleasure of eloquence is in greatest part owing often to the stimulus of the occasion which produces it,—to the magic of sympathy, which exalts the feeling of each by radiating on him the feeling of all.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Art," Society and Solitude (1870).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, magic, sympathy
  • 47.
    There is something terribly morbid in the modern sympathy with pain. One should sympathise with the colour, the beauty, the joy of life. The less said about life's sores the better.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).)
  • 48.
    Solitude is impractical, and society fatal. We must keep our head in the one and our hands in the other. The conditions are met, if we keep our independence, yet do not lose our sympathy.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Society and Solitude," Society and Solitude (1870).)
  • 49.
    The child realizes to every man his own earliest remembrance, and so supplies a defect in our education, or enables us to live over the unconscious history with a sympathy so tender as to be almost personal experience.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Domestic Life," Society and Solitude (1870).)
  • 50.
    When there is sympathy, there needs but one wise man in a company and all are wise,—so, a blockhead makes a blockhead of his companion. Wonderful power to benumb possesses this brother.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Considerations by the Way," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
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