Quotations About / On: SYMPATHY

  • 31.
    While it may not heighten our sympathy, wit widens our horizons by its flashes, revealing remote hidden affiliations and drawing laughter from far afield; humor, in contrast, strikes up fellow feeling, and though it does not leap so much across time and space, enriches our insight into the universal in familiar things, lending it a local habitation and a name.
    (Marie Collins Swabey. Comic Laughter, ch. 5, Yale University Press (1961).)
  • 32.
    In their sympathies, children feel nearer animals than adults. They frolic with animals, caress them, share with them feelings neither has words for. Have they ever stroked any adult with the love they bestow on a cat? Hugged any grownup with the ecstasy they feel when clasping a puppy?
    (Jessamyn West (1907-1984), U.S. novelist and autobiographer. The Life I Really Lived, part 1 (1979).)
    More quotations from: Jessamyn West, cat, children, love
  • 33.
    In the end, for congenial sympathy, for poetry, for work, for original feeling and expression, for perfect companionship with one's friends—give me the country.
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. letter, Feb. 28, 1909. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 1, ed. James T. Boulton (1979).)
  • 34.
    It is by a wise economy of nature that those who suffer without change, and whom no one can help, become uninteresting. Yet so it may happen that those who need sympathy the most often attract it the least.
    (F.H. (Francis Herbert) Bradley (1846-1924), British philosopher. Aphorisms, no. 22 (1930).)
  • 35.
    I would rather be kept alive in the efficient if cold altruism of a large hospital than expire in a gush of warm sympathy in a small one.
    (Aneurin Bevan (1897-1960), British Labour politician. Speech, April 30, 1946, House of Commons.)
    More quotations from: Aneurin Bevan, sympathy, cold
  • 36.
    When we hate a person, with an intimate, imaginative, human hatred, we enter into his mind, or sympathize—any strong interest will arouse the imagination and create some sort of sympathy.
    (Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 4 (1902).)
  • 37.
    It is in the comprehension of the physically disabled, or disordered ... that we are behind our age.... sympathy as a fine art is backward in the growth of progress ...
    (Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844-1911), U.S. novelist and short story writer. Chapters from a Life, ch. 11 (1897).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, sympathy
  • 38.
    It is in our faults and failings, not in our virtues, that we touch each other, and find sympathy.... It is in our follies that we are one.
    (Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927), British author. "On Vanity and Vanities," Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow (1889).)
    More quotations from: Jerome K Jerome, sympathy
  • 39.
    The professional must learn to be moved and touched emotionally, yet at the same time stand back objectively: I've seen a lot of damage done by tea and sympathy.
    (Anthony Storr (b. 1920), British psychiatrist. Quoted in Times (London, October 22, 1992).)
    More quotations from: Anthony Storr, sympathy, time
  • 40.
    In a cabinet of natural history, we become sensible of a certain occult recognition and sympathy in regard to the most unwieldy and eccentric forms of beast, fish, and insect.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 8 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
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