Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: SYMPATHY

  • 1.
    Sympathy with joy intensifies the sum of sympathy in the world, sympathy with pain does not really diminish the amount of pain.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The Soul of Man Under Socialism," Fortnightly Review.)
  • 2.
    Self-pity dries up our sympathy for others.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Ninth Selection, New York (1992).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, sympathy
  • 3.
    In any combat between a rogue and a fool the sympathy of mankind is always with the rogue.
    (H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken (18801956), U.S. journalist, critic. A Mencken Chrestomathy, ch. 30, p. 616, Knopf (1949).)
    More quotations from: H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken, sympathy
  • 4.
    Sympathy for victims is always counter-balanced by an equal and opposite feeling of resentment towards them.
    (Ben Elton (b. 1959), British author, performer. "On the Business of Stark," Stark (1989).)
    More quotations from: Ben Elton, sympathy
  • 5.
    The delicate and infirm go for sympathy, not to the well and buoyant, but to those who have suffered like themselves.
    (Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator, writer. "Statistics of Female Health," Woman Suffrage and Women's Professions (1871).)
    More quotations from: Catherine E Beecher, sympathy
  • 6.
    To desire and expect nothing for oneself—and to have profound sympathy for others—is genuine holiness.
    (Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev (1818-1883), Russian author. Letter, October 28, 1862, to Countess Elizaveta Lambert. Turgenev: Letters, ed. David Lowe (1983).)
    More quotations from: Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev, sympathy
  • 7.
    Children, even infants, are capable of sympathy. But only after adolescence are we capable of compassion.
    (Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Adolescence, ch. 12 (1984).)
    More quotations from: Louise J Kaplan, sympathy, children
  • 8.
    Women have no sympathy ... and my experience of women is almost as large as Europe.
    (Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), British nurse. letter, Dec. 13, 1861. Forever Yours, Florence Nightingale: Selected Letters, ch. 3 (1989). Refuting the argument that women had been more sympathetic to her work than men.)
  • 9.
    In externals we advance with lightening express speed, in modes of thought and sympathy we lumber on in stage-coach fashion.
    (Frances E. Willard 1839-1898, U.S. president of the Women's Christian Temperance Union 1879-1891, author, activist. The Woman's Magazine, pp. 137-40 (January 1887). . . . )
    More quotations from: Frances E Willard, sympathy
  • 10.
    I answered my father's demands for sympathy with silence.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Tenth Selection, New York (1992).)
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