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Quotations About / On: SUN

  • 31.
    We imagined that the sun shining on their bare heads had stamped a liberal and public character on their most private thoughts.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 226, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 32.
    A great cause of the night is lack of the sun.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Corin, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 28. The shepherd's homespun philosophy.)
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  • 33.
    We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 120-2. "On" means by.)
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  • 34.
    Really to see the sun rise or go down every day, so to relate ourselves to a universal fact, would preserve us sane forever.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, pp. 472-473, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forever, sun
  • 35.
    "Dark times" is what they call it in Norway when the sun remains below the horizon all day long: the temperature falls slowly but surely at such times.—A nice metaphor for all those thinkers for whom the sun of mankind's future has temporarily disappeared.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 638, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Wanderer and His Shadow, aphorism 191, "Dark Times," (1880).)
  • 36.
    [Man's] life consists in a relation with all things: stone, earth, trees, flowers, water, insects, fishes, birds, creatures, sun, rainbow, children, women, other men. But his greatest and final relation is with the sun.
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by Centaur Press (Philadelphia, 1925). "Aristocracy," Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine, M. Secker (1934).)
  • 37.
    To be together again, after so long, who love the sunny wind, the windy sun, in the sun, in the wind, that is perhaps something, perhaps something.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1953. Sam, in Watt, p. 163, Grove Press (1959).)
  • 38.
    Sun up, sun down, the days slip by and the sand lifted by the breeze will swallow my ship; but I will die here, as I am, standing in my little garden. What joy!
    (Simone Schwarz-Bart (b. 1938), Gaudeloupean author. The Bridge of Beyond, p. 249, Éditions du Seuil (1972).)
    More quotations from: Simone Schwarz-Bart, sun, joy
  • 39.
    To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and the heart of the child.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 1 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
  • 40.
    If I venture to displace ... the microscopical speck of dust... on the point of my finger,... I have done a deed which shakes the Moon in her path, which causes the Sun to be no longer the Sun, and which alters forever the destiny of multitudinous myriads of stars.
    (Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Eureka, George P. Putnam (1848). Prefiguring the "butterfly effect.")
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