Quotations About / On: SUN

  • 21.
    The sun will not shine on any country that has borders with ours.
    (Herodotus (c. 484-424 B.C.), Greek historian. The Histories, 7.8.)
    More quotations from: Herodotus, shine, sun
  • 22.
    Sun, I come to see you for the last time.
    (Jean Racine (1639-1699), French playwright. Phaedra, in Phaedra, act 1, sc. 3 (1677). Phaedra is considering killing herself (or dying of grief).)
    More quotations from: Jean Racine, sun, time
  • 23.
    The sun has not yet set for all time.
    (Titus Livius (Livy) (59 B.C.-A.D. 17), Roman historian. Histories, XXXIX, 26.)
    More quotations from: Titus Livius (Livy), sun, time
  • 24.
    The sun cares nothing for illumination.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fifth Selection, New York (1988).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, sun
  • 25.
    One mustn't ask apple trees for oranges, France for sun, women for love, life for happiness.
    (Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Trans. by William G. Allen. Pensées de Gustave Flaubert, p. 3, Conard (1915).)
  • 26.
    Freedom and whores are the most cosmopolitan items under the sun.
    (Georg Büchner (1813-1837), German dramatist, revolutionary. Trans. by Gerhard P. Knapp (1995). Danton's Death, act IV (1835).)
    More quotations from: Georg Büchner, freedom, sun
  • 27.
    A black sun has appeared in the sky of my motherland.
    (Wuer Kaixi, Chinese student leader. Quoted in Independent (London, June 29, 1989). Said about the events in Tiananmen Square, Beijing.)
    More quotations from: Wuer Kaixi, sky, black, sun
  • 28.
    On neither the sun, nor death, can a man look fixedly.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. Maximes, no. 26 (1678).)
  • 29.
    Genius unrefined resembles a flash of lightning, but wisdom is like the sun.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1809).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, sun
  • 30.
    These late eclipses in the sun and moon portend no good to us.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 103-4. "Late" means recent.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, moon, sun
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