Quotations About / On: SUMMER

  • 21.
    Country acquaintances are charming only in the country and only in the summer. In the city in winter they lose half of their appeal.
    (Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. narrator in The Story of Mme. NN, Works, vol. 6, p. 452, "Nauka" (1976).)
  • 22.
    A healthy man, indeed, is the complement of the seasons, and in winter, summer is in his heart.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 168, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 23.
    The dinner-hour is the summer of the day: full of sunshine, I grant; but not like the mellow autumn of supper.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 181, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by King Media.)
  • 24.
    O the evening robin, at the end of a New England summer day! If I could ever find the twig he sits upon!
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 344, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, summer
  • 25.
    And so the seasons went rolling on into summer, as one rambles into higher and higher grass.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 351, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 26.
    The very locusts and crickets of a summer day are but later or earlier glosses on the Dherma Sastra of the Hindoos, a continuation of the sacred code.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 157, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, summer
  • 27.
    We are reformers in spring and summer; in autumn and winter, we stand by the old; reformers in the morning, conservers at night.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, December 9, 1841, at the Masonic Temple, Boston, Massachusetts. "The Conservative," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).)
  • 28.
    Nature confounds her summer distinctions at this season. The heavens seem to be nearer the earth. The elements are less reserved and distinct. Water turns to ice, rain to snow. The day is but a Scandinavian night. The winter is an arctic summer.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 170, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 29.
    That night was the turning-point in the season. We had gone to bed in summer, and we awoke in autumn; for summer passes into autumn in some imaginable point of time, like the turning of a leaf.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 356, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 30.
    Snake and Ladder game appears to me, in a sense, an oversimplification of life. Life is much more complex than either climbing heights or being python swallowed. For many, living has been a long summer of grazing in a deficient pasture or a cruel winter of gazing at the stars, without ever a lift or even a slide.
    (Prasanna Mishra, born in 1942, lives in Bhubaneswar (India) . A former civil servant, he is a columnist and a social activist. Does not like to call a spade by any other name.)
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