Quotations About / On: SUMMER

  • 11.
    Fact: Girls who are having a good sex thing stay in New York. The rest want to spend their summer vacations in Europe.
    (Gail Parent (b. 1941), U.S. author. "Europe," Sheila Levine Is Dead and Living in New York (1972).)
    More quotations from: Gail Parent, stay, summer
  • 12.
    For one swallow does not make a summer, nor does one day; and so too one day, or a short time, does not make a man blessed and happy.
    (Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Nichomachean Ethics I.7: 1098a18-19, Complete Works of Aristotle, trans. by W.D. Ross, ed. Jonathan Barnes, Princeton University Press (1984). An important qualification of Aristotle's definition of happiness.)
    More quotations from: Aristotle, summer, happy, time
  • 13.
    France has neither winter nor summer nor morals—apart from these drawbacks it is a fine country.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Mark Twain's Notebooks and Journals, entry in notebook 18, vol. 2, ed. Frederick Anderson (1975).)
  • 14.
    I hope we shall give them a thorough drubbing this summer, and then change our tomahawk into a golden chain of friendship.
    (Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, April 15, 1791, to Charles Carroll. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 20, p. 214, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).)
  • 15.
    Our [British] summers are often, though beautiful for verdure, so cold, that they are rather cold winters.
    (Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 52, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.)
    More quotations from: Horace Walpole, cold, beautiful
  • 16.
    Country acquaintances are charming only in the country and only in the summer. In the city in winter they lose half of their appeal.
    (Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. narrator in The Story of Mme. NN, Works, vol. 6, p. 452, "Nauka" (1976).)
  • 17.
    A healthy man, indeed, is the complement of the seasons, and in winter, summer is in his heart.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 168, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 18.
    The dinner-hour is the summer of the day: full of sunshine, I grant; but not like the mellow autumn of supper.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 181, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by King Media.)
  • 19.
    O the evening robin, at the end of a New England summer day! If I could ever find the twig he sits upon!
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 344, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, summer
  • 20.
    And so the seasons went rolling on into summer, as one rambles into higher and higher grass.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 351, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, summer
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