Quotations About / On: SUMMER

  • 11.
    For one swallow does not make a summer, nor does one day; and so too one day, or a short time, does not make a man blessed and happy.
    (Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Nichomachean Ethics I.7: 1098a18-19, Complete Works of Aristotle, trans. by W.D. Ross, ed. Jonathan Barnes, Princeton University Press (1984). An important qualification of Aristotle's definition of happiness.)
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  • 12.
    France has neither winter nor summer nor morals—apart from these drawbacks it is a fine country.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Mark Twain's Notebooks and Journals, entry in notebook 18, vol. 2, ed. Frederick Anderson (1975).)
  • 13.
    I hope we shall give them a thorough drubbing this summer, and then change our tomahawk into a golden chain of friendship.
    (Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, April 15, 1791, to Charles Carroll. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 20, p. 214, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).)
  • 14.
    Our [British] summers are often, though beautiful for verdure, so cold, that they are rather cold winters.
    (Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 52, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.)
    More quotations from: Horace Walpole, cold, beautiful
  • 15.
    Country acquaintances are charming only in the country and only in the summer. In the city in winter they lose half of their appeal.
    (Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. narrator in The Story of Mme. NN, Works, vol. 6, p. 452, "Nauka" (1976).)
  • 16.
    A healthy man, indeed, is the complement of the seasons, and in winter, summer is in his heart.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 168, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 17.
    The dinner-hour is the summer of the day: full of sunshine, I grant; but not like the mellow autumn of supper.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 181, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by King Media.)
  • 18.
    O the evening robin, at the end of a New England summer day! If I could ever find the twig he sits upon!
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 344, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 19.
    And so the seasons went rolling on into summer, as one rambles into higher and higher grass.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 351, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 20.
    The very locusts and crickets of a summer day are but later or earlier glosses on the Dherma Sastra of the Hindoos, a continuation of the sacred code.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 157, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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