Learn More

Quotations About / On: SPRING

  • 21.
    We loiter in winter while it is already spring.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 346, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, winter, spring
  • 22.
    I have never had a feeling politically that did not spring from the sentiments embodied in the Declaration of Independence.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Feb. 22, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 240, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
    More quotations from: Abraham Lincoln, spring
  • 23.
    Fresh curls spring from the baldest brow. There is nothing inorganic.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 340, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, spring
  • 24.
    Passion, though a bad regulator, is a powerful spring.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Considerations by the Way," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, passion, spring
  • 25.
    Yet there is no spring in Florida, neither in boskage perdu, nor on the nunnery beaches.
    (Wallace Stevens (1879-1955), U.S. poet. "Indian River.")
    More quotations from: Wallace Stevens, spring
  • 26.
    The buds swell imperceptibly, without hurry or confusion, as if the short spring days were an eternity.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, pp. 110-111, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, spring
  • 27.
    It is disturbing to discover in oneself these curious revelations of the validity of the Darwinian theory. If it is true that we have sprung from the ape, there are occasions when my own spring appears not to have been very far.
    (Cornelia Otis Skinner (1901-1979), U.S. author, actor. "The Ape in Me," The Ape in Me (1959).)
    More quotations from: Cornelia Otis Skinner, spring
  • 28.
    The first sparrow of spring! The year beginning with younger hope than ever!... What at such a time are histories, chronologies, traditions, and all written revelations? The brooks sing carols and glees to the spring.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 342, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 29.
    Huck waited for no particulars. He sprang away and sped down the hill as fast as his legs could carry him.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 29 (1876).)
  • 30.
    They may walk with a little less spring in their step, and the ranks are growing thinner, but let us never forget, when they were young, these men saved the world.
    (Bill Clinton (b. 1946), U.S. president. Washington Post, p. A1 (June 7, 1994). In Normandy, on the 50th anniversary of the Allied landings, June 6, 1944.)
    More quotations from: Bill Clinton, spring, world
[Hata Bildir]