Learn More

Quotations About / On: SLEEP

  • 41.
    The main facts in human life are five: birth, food, sleep, love and death.
    (E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Aspects of the Novel, ch. 3 (1927).)
  • 42.
    Freedom is the moment between sleep and waking before selfhood and the world return.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Sixth Selection, New York (1989).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, sleep, freedom, world
  • 43.
    When action grows unprofitable, gather information; when information grows unprofitable, sleep.
    (Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929), U.S. author. The Left Hand of Darkness, ch. 3 (1969).)
    More quotations from: Ursula K Le Guin, sleep
  • 44.
    There dwell the children of the dark Night, the dread gods Sleep and Death.
    (Hesiod (c. 8th century B.C.), Greek didactic poet. Theogony, 603.)
  • 45.
    The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angelo, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 2, l. 90. Reminding Isabella that the laws have existed even though they have not been enforced for some time.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare
  • 46.
    Every man has to learn the points of the compass again as often as he awakes, whether from sleep or any abstraction.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, pp. 189-190, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sleep
  • 47.
    The undeserver may sleep when the man of action is called on.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 4, l. 376-7.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, sleep
  • 48.
    The man who says his evening prayer is a captain posting his sentinels. He can sleep.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. My Heart Laid Bare, sect. 116 (written c. 1865), published in Intimate Journals (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), revised by Don Bachardy (1989).)
    More quotations from: Charles Baudelaire, sleep
  • 49.
    But since all is well, keep it so, wake not a sleeping wolf.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lord Chief Justice, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 153-4. Advising Falstaff not to get into trouble with the law.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare
  • 50.
    Railroad iron is a magician's rod, in its power to evoke the sleeping energies of land and water.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, February 7, 1844, the Mercantile Library Association, Boston, Massachusetts. "The Young American," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, water, power
[Hata Bildir]