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Quotations About / On: SLEEP

  • 41.
    The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angelo, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 2, l. 90. Reminding Isabella that the laws have existed even though they have not been enforced for some time.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare
  • 42.
    Every man has to learn the points of the compass again as often as he awakes, whether from sleep or any abstraction.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, pp. 189-190, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sleep
  • 43.
    The undeserver may sleep when the man of action is called on.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 4, l. 376-7.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, sleep
  • 44.
    The man who says his evening prayer is a captain posting his sentinels. He can sleep.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. My Heart Laid Bare, sect. 116 (written c. 1865), published in Intimate Journals (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), revised by Don Bachardy (1989).)
    More quotations from: Charles Baudelaire, sleep
  • 45.
    But since all is well, keep it so, wake not a sleeping wolf.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lord Chief Justice, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 153-4. Advising Falstaff not to get into trouble with the law.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare
  • 46.
    Railroad iron is a magician's rod, in its power to evoke the sleeping energies of land and water.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, February 7, 1844, the Mercantile Library Association, Boston, Massachusetts. "The Young American," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, water, power
  • 47.
    Sleep takes off the costume of circumstance, arms us with terrible freedom, so that every will rushes to a deed.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Demonology," Lectures and Biographical Sketches (1883, repr. 1904).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, sleep, freedom
  • 48.
    The last refuge of the insomniac is a sense of superiority to the sleeping world.
    (Leonard Cohen (b. 1934), Canadian singer, poet, novelist. Lawrence Breavman, in The Favourite Game, bk. 4, sct. 12 (1963).)
    More quotations from: Leonard Cohen, world
  • 49.
    Strange is this alien despotism of Sleep which takes two persons lying in each other's arms & separates them leagues, continents, asunder.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Concord and Discord (1835-1838)," quoted in Joel Porte, Emerson in His Journals (1982).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, sleep
  • 50.
    Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 100, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sleep
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