Quotations About / On: SLEEP

  • 31.
    I do not understand the capricious lewdness of the sleeping mind.
    (John Cheever (1912-1982), U.S. author. "The Late Forties and the Fifties," John Cheever: The Journals, ed. Robert Gottlieb (1991). 1955 entry.)
    More quotations from: John Cheever
  • 32.
    Men who are unhappy, like men who sleep badly, are always proud of the fact.
    (Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician. The Conquest of Happiness, ch. 1 (1930).)
    More quotations from: Bertrand Russell, sleep
  • 33.
    One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.
    (Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. A Room of One's Own, ch. 1 (1929).)
    More quotations from: Virginia Woolf, sleep, love
  • 34.
    They are not sleeping, but even if they were fast asleep, I'd respect their dreams more than your waking thoughts.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Dobra, in Libussa, act 1 (1872).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, respect
  • 35.
    Sleep is when all the unsorted stuff comes flying out as from a dustbin upset in a high wind.
    (William Golding (b. 1911), British author. Pincher Martin, ch. 6 (1956).)
    More quotations from: William Golding, wind, sleep
  • 36.
    The main facts in human life are five: birth, food, sleep, love and death.
    (E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Aspects of the Novel, ch. 3 (1927).)
  • 37.
    Freedom is the moment between sleep and waking before selfhood and the world return.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Sixth Selection, New York (1989).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, sleep, freedom, world
  • 38.
    When action grows unprofitable, gather information; when information grows unprofitable, sleep.
    (Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929), U.S. author. The Left Hand of Darkness, ch. 3 (1969).)
    More quotations from: Ursula K Le Guin, sleep
  • 39.
    There dwell the children of the dark Night, the dread gods Sleep and Death.
    (Hesiod (c. 8th century B.C.), Greek didactic poet. Theogony, 603.)
  • 40.
    The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angelo, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 2, l. 90. Reminding Isabella that the laws have existed even though they have not been enforced for some time.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare
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